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Summer Courses 2017: Math Courses with Oxford Tutoring

Oxford Tutoring is offering a variety of summer courses redesigned with your schedule in mind.  Choose from math, reading & writing, enrichment courses, or ACT and SAT courses to prepare your children for the upcoming school year.

Summer Mathematics Courses

1st Grade Math

In our 1st Grade Math class, students will use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions. They will put math facts to memory and extend their understanding of number sense to complete math challenges. Request more information

2nd Grade Math

In our 2nd Grade Math class, students will add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value. Students will also hone their understanding of basic word problems and how to extract the critical information for problem-solving. They will refine math facts knowledge and extend their understanding of number sense to complete math challenges. Request more information

3rd Grade Math

In our 3rd Grade Math class, students will use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities. They will commit multiplication facts to memory and develop strategies for expressing conceptual understanding. Students will not only develop the proficiency necessary for the upcoming school year, but will also be inspired to learn through interactive, exciting projects, including game theory, wherein students engage in metacognition and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

4th Grade Math

In our 4th Grade Math class, students will find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100 and recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. They will develop procedural understanding of the algorithms for adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing multi-digit numbers and explore various ways of completing these operations. This course will prepare students for the new school year by incorporating both skill building and exciting, interactive activities designed to teach and inspire, including game theory, wherein students engage in metacognition and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

5th Grade Math

In our 5th Grade Math class, students will add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions and decimals, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value. They will develop procedural understanding of the algorithms for adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing decimals and fractions and explore various ways of completing these operations. Through this course, students will receive instruction to develop vital skills for the upcoming school year in a fun, interactive learning environment, including game theory, wherein students engage in metacognition and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

6th Grade Math

In our 6th Grade Math class, students will understand the concept of a unit rate a/b associated with a ratio and use rate language in the context of a proportional relationship. They will review algorithms for adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing decimals and fractions and set-up simple equations with a single variable. Students will build the skills necessary for their upcoming school year through fun, interactive projects designed to inspire them to learn, and be introduced to game theory, an exciting branch of mathematics that allows them to have great discussions, engage in metacognition, and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

7th Grade Math

In our 7th Grade Math class, students will apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients. They will integrate knowledge of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratios and proportions to solve two-step problems and tackle math challenges. In this course, preparation for their upcoming school will be presented in an exciting, interactive learning environment wherein they will be introduced to game theory, an exciting branch of mathematics that allows students to have great discussions, engage in metacognition, and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

8th Grade Math

In our 8th Grade Math class, students will understand that a function is a rule that assigns to each input exactly one output and how the graph of a function is the set of ordered pairs consisting of an input and the corresponding output. They will hone procedural skills for setting-up and solving equations, graphing linear equations and inequalities, and expressing conceptual understanding. Students will also develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year, while learning through interactive, fun projects, including game theory, an exciting branch of mathematics that allows students to have great discussions, engage in metacognition, and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

Integrated Math 1 (9th-11th grades)

In our Integrated Math 1 course, students learn to analyze and compare linear models, understand congruent figures and their properties, and apply both geometry and algebra concepts to multi-step problems that challenge their thinking and ensure they have a solid grasp of the first semester of Integrated Math 1 courses at local schools. Students will develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year while learning through a mix of lecture, interactive projects, exploration and analysis, discussions, and metacognitive activities. Request more information

Integrated Math 2 (10th-12th grades)

In our Integrated Math 2 course, students explore quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; compare quadratics to linear and exponential expressions; compare rational, real, and complex numbers; and utilize conditional probability and the counting principle to ensure they have a solid grasp of the first semester of Integrated Math 2 courses at local schools. Students will develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year while learning through a mix of lecture, interactive projects, exploration and analysis, discussions, and metacognitive activities. Request more information

Integrated Math 3 (10th-12th grades)

In our Integrated Math 3 course, students deepen their understanding of probability and statistics, compare rational and radical functions, break down general triangles, and learn trigonometry and preCalculus concepts to ensure they have a solid grasp of the first semester of Integrated Math 3 courses at local schools. Students will develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year while learning through a mix of lecture, interactive projects, exploration and analysis, discussions, and metacognitive activities. Request more information

Competitive Math (9th-10th grades)

High School Competitive Mathematics builds and develops the necessary problem-solving skills and mathematical knowledge required for math competitions such as the American Mathematics Competition 10 (AMC 10). Students will apply and expand on classroom learned skills involving algebra, basic geometry, area and volume formulas, elementary number theory, and elementary probability. Each class, students will expand their problem solving abilities and apply test taking strategies to problems from past exams. Request more information

Algebra I

Students will establish a solid basis for Algebra success in the upcoming year. Students will explore exponents, radicals, equations, inequalities, quadratics, and graphing. Particularly, the class will teach students the primary concepts presented in the first semester of Algebra and expose them to more challenging topics that they will encounter during the second semester. Request more information

Geometry

Geometry students will prepare for success in the upcoming school year by learning to reason and problem solve based upon an understanding of the theorems and postulates of geometry. Students will learn to work with angles, polygons, and circles by using logic to solve problems. Particularly, students will develop mathematical reasoning skills. Request more information

Algebra 2 with Trigonometry

Students will solve and/or graph rational functions, irrational functions, matrices, logarithms, exponential growth and decay, conics, trigonometry, and other challenging topics. This course will ensure that they are well-prepared for the school year. Request more information

Pre-Calculus

Students master trigonometric functions, the unit circle, limits, graphing, complex polynomials, logarithms, conics, and exponents. Students master the first semester of Pre-Calculus with a focus on developing problem solving skills and building confidence to tackle challenging problems. Request more information

AP Calculus

In our AP Calculus course, students learn the operations and applications of limits and derivatives, related rates and curve stretching to ensure they have a solid grasp of the first semester of the AP Calculus concepts taught at local schools. Students will develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year while learning through a mix of lecture, projects, exploration and analysis, discussions, and metacognitive activities. Request more information

AP Statistics

Students study the first semester of AP Statistics, specifically descriptive statistics, normal distribution, linear regression, and probability. Request more information

 

Sign up for any of our Math Courses today! (949) 681-0388.

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Posted in ACT, Algebra, Biology, Book, Calculus, classes, College Planning, Computer Science, Courses, Education, ELA, essay, Geometry ', STEAM, summer, Uncategorized

Summer Classes Begin Today!

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 It’s not too late to sign up! Call us today. (949) 681-0388.

Don’t forget summer session 2 begins July 18th. ‪

What are the benefits of taking summer courses?

Studies show that over the summer, students experience a drop in their academic learning, something that is known as the summer slide.  Most students spend very little time engaging in activities that keep their brains active and growing.  Summer courses are an ideal way to maintain what students learned throughout the school year, and even get ahead for the upcoming school year.  And let’s face it,  students face a lot of pressure to take on AP classes, extracurriculars, and to have solid grades.  Summer is a great time to help alleviate some of that stress.  Don’t let your student’s summer go to waste!

How are your students going to spend their summer?

Oxford Tutoring is offering a variety of courses including STEM Courses, ACT and SAT Test Prep, Mathematics, Science Courses and much more.  Keep reading to find out more!

1. How about enhancing their understanding of those challenging math concepts?

Mathematics is a foundational skill that all students must learn.  We are offering the following summer courses:

1st – 8th Grade Math

Algebra 1

Geometry

Algebra 2 Trigonometry

Pre-Calculus

Integrated Math 1

Integrated Math 2

Integrated Math 3

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Get a head-start on concepts from the upcoming school year.

2. Do you want to give them a head start in cutting edge careers?  Try STEM Courses.

Oxford Tutoring is aware of the importance of incorporating STEM into student’s education.   That is why we are covering a variety of summer courses including:

Build a Computer

Python Programming

Website Design

AP Calculus

AP Statistics

AP Physics

AP Computer Science

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Review troublesome concepts from last year and be ready to jump into the next school year.

3. Have they discovered their scientific aptitude yet?

For some students, science can feel like a different language, for others, it can open the door to an exciting new world.  For either student, we have the summer courses to match:

Science Explorer 1 (Grades 3-4)

Science Explorer 2 (Grades 5-6)

Science Explorer 3 (Grades 7-8)

Integrated Science 1

Integrated Science 2

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Trade those lazy summer hours for productive academic practice and skill building.

4. Do they need to improve their reading and writing skills or push to become the next Shakespeare?

Some students have a passion for writing, and here at Oxford Tutoring, we want to give them the tools to excel in their writing.  We also have support for students needing to improve reading and writing skills, an imperative skill to help them succeed in their college lives and beyond.  We offer these summer courses:

1st – 10th Grade English

Creative Writing Workshop (Middle School)

Creative Writing Workshop (High School)

Essay Writing Clinic

Northwood High Required Reading (9th Grade)

Northwood High Required Reading (AP English)

Irvine High Required Reading (9th Grade)

Irvine High Required Reading (AP English)

Intro to Speech and Debate

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Provide support for your student’s education with engaging summer courses.

5. Should they be preparing for the academic rigors of college life?

At Oxford Tutoring, we want to set up your students for the best chance to succeed in their college life.  Which is why we provide summer courses to prepare them the challenges of college:

High Stakes Writing

This course is broken up into two sections: (1) SAT/ACT essays, and (2) college application essays, where students learn to write polished essays.

PSAT

Students in 8th-10th grades should begin preparing for the newly formatted SAT.  The materials and pacing of instruction are designed to build on classroom studies, providing extended instruction at the SAT level.

ACT and SAT

Students learn Oxford’s proven strategies by master instructors whose students have consistently scored at the top.  Small classes, weekly testing on full-length exams, test report and reviews, and personalized tutoring are included in the course fee.  Students in the SAT and ACT courses may purchase discounted packages of private tutoring sessions.  All courses guarantee score increases of at least 10 percent.

If you do not find a summer course that fits your schedule, we have private tutoring available, or the option of creating a class for your student and a few of their friends.

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Seats are filling up, so sign up today!  Call Oxford Tutoring for class times at (949) 681-0388.

© Oxford Tutoring 2016

Posted in ACT, Algebra, Anamtoy, Bilingual, Biology, Book, Calculus, Chemistry, Child, College Admissions, College Planning, Computer Science, Education, ELA, English Language Arts Tutoring, Homework Help, Individualized Tutoring, K-12 Tutoring, Learning Activties, Math Tutoring, Mathematics, New SAT, New year 2016, New Year's, Reading, SAT, SAT Test Prep, Studying, Tutoring, Uncategorized

10 Study Tips to Study More Effectively in 2016

2016

The New Year is just days away.  For many, it’s a fresh start; a chance to re-evaluate decisions made in the past year and their results.  Was my money well spent?  Did I make exercise a priority?  And if the answers aren’t to the individuals liking, the New Year provides an opportunity to make some changes.  At Oxford Tutoring, we suggest, in the next few days before the New Year, students take the same action, focusing particularly on their studies.

Ask yourselves a few questions: Did I get the grades I wanted this last semester?  Did I put the effort into school that I wanted to?  Did I feel prepared for the tests I took?  If your answer to any or all of these questions is no, then most likely it is time to evaluate your study habits, then consider adopting some new ones so that you can start off 2016 academically strong.

Study

Here is a list that we at Oxford Tutoring have compiled of tips to study more effectively in 2016.  Even if you choose to use only one of the tools, you are already in a better place for 2016 then you were in 2015.

 

Planner Icon

#1: Get a Planner

PlannerIt seems simple enough and it is.  But planners are an often overlooked option for preparing to take exams.  And don’t just buy a planner, make sure that you actually use it!  There you can put down every upcoming test,
every project, every deadline.  You can even add checklists, use different color pens, utilize post-it notes or develop whatever system necessary to help you get organized.

Why does organization matter in becoming a more effective studier?  Keeping track of upcoming tests and events will help you be prepared.  If you know what is coming you can prepare for it.  And your grades will not suffer from those inevitablely forgotten assignments which can quickly add up if you aren’t paying attention.

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Furthermore, putting down everything on paper is an excellent way to clear your mind.  Worries about deadlines can often creep into our subconscious and nag at us even if we do not realize it.  With all your to do’s written down, your thoughts have room to breathe and focus on the task at hand.  It will be easier to study and easier to retain information with a clear mind.

 

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#2: Plan Ahead

Plan ahead

Now that you have purchased your planner and filled it up with tests and project dates, you have the chance to look down the road and see what lies ahead.  Which means, you can plan ahead.  Mark out time in your calendar to study.  Make it a priority, or set it up as a checklist that you make sure to complete before you move onto anything else.

Study all nightAdditionally, it is extremely helpful to study a little bit every day.  One of the biggest mistakes students make is that they prepare for their tests and write their papers the night before.  This works against you in several ways.  First of all, the stress level alone means you are not going to be as present while studying.  Secondly, trying to cram week’s worth of learning or writing into one evening is an excellent way not to learn.  Lastly, because you have jammed all that information into your brain just for one test, chances are once the test is over, all that information is going to fall away.  This will be detrimental come final’s time; and, even more harmful in classes like Math and Science, where concepts build upon one another, meaning that it is necessary to have a firm foundation of one formula before being able to understand another.

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#3: Determine Your Learning StyleLearning style.jpg

In order to be able to study the most effectively, it is imperative that a student knows what study habits work for him or her and what study habits do not.  Many students do not take an assessment on their learning style until college, if then.  Meaning that they may have spent years struggling through studying simply because they did not know  there were other resources available to them based on how they learn.

There are three main learning styles: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic.  A quick break down of these styles is that visual learners retain information through what they see.  These are usually the students that all of their friends are jealous of because they can remember facts just by viewing them.  Then, there are auditory learners.  These are the students that do best recalling knowledge if they have heard it out loud.  Lastly, kinesthetic learners are those that require touching and moving in order to best understand what it is that they are learning.

To figure out what learning style you are, take the quiz.

 

apply learning style

#4: Use Learning Style Study Methods

Once you determine youR learning style, you can use suggested study methods to better prepare for tests.

Check out the following lists to get some ideas.

Study Tips - Visual

Study Tips - Kinesthetic

Study Tips - Auditory

 

Take a break icon

#5: Set a Scheduled Break

There is only so much information you can remember in one sitting of studying.  And while some may think that taking break is counterproductive in reality, breaks give your mind a chance to rest.  Therefore, you can come back to your study table refreshed and ready to take on more reading.

So get to know your own mind.  Do you tend to stop remembering what you are studying after 30 minutes, an hour, or an hour and a half?  Whatever it is, set an alarm on your phone as a reminder to get up from your desk and let your brain breathe.

For weekly tests, you probably do not want to take more than a ten minute break.  However, if you are preparing for a big test, such as a final or an SAT or ACT, taking longer breaks around 20 minutes is recommended.

Basketball break.jpgNo matter how long the break, do not, I repeat do not go on Instagram, play a video game or turn on the TV.  These activities are not actually giving your brain a rest.  Furthermore, you will most likely end up spending longer than your planned break and waste precious study time.  It is ideal to grab a healthy snack, get outside or go for a quick walk.  On your longer breaks, consider shooting hoops or playing a quick game of catch.  Exercise helps your brain in a number of ways, including fighting stress and improving your ability to focus.  (It’s true, really!)

If you are in a time crunch, instead of taking a break, switch subjects.  For example, if it is finals week, and you have a History final and Mathematics final on the same day, you may find it helpful to switch from History to Math after an hour and a half.

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So, schedule your break for a time that will be most helpful for you, and take that break you have earned it.  But do not, I repeat, do not go on Instagram.

 

study envionment

#6: Set up a Study Environment

Just as important as the way that you study is the environment in which you study.

Why?

Because much like your routine before you go bed, is the routine you Study deskestablish when studying.  For example, when you get ready for bed you might (hopefully) first brush your teeth, then wash your face, put on your pajamas, set your alarm, and finally hop into bed.  These steps, taken in the same order most nights, signal to your brain that it is time to sleep.  Forget one of your steps or add surfing the web while lying in bed to your routine, and you may find yourself tossing and turning.

take a tstThis is the same for when you study. If you listen to music while studying, your brain will associate the information you are learning with music.  So when you go to class and sit down to take a test, your brain will have a harder time recalling that information because it will be waiting for music that never actually plays.

Furthermore, the classroom environment is generally quiet, your desk is empty, and you’re sitting in a hardback chair.  So when studying try and mimic this layout and atmosphere.

 

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#7: Get Several Good Nights of Sleep

Speaking of sleep, getting several good night’s rest in a row is important.  When getting ready for a test, it is not enough to simpsleeply get in your eight hours of sleep the night before.  (And hey guys, it should be at least 8 hours.  Because, as an adolescent, your bodies and brains are working harder as they develop, studies  show that most teenager actually need closer to 9 1/2 hours to feel fully refreshed). Your body won’t feel the full effect of that rest until a couple of days later.  So, ideally, you want to be sleeping well for several nights in a row before a big test.

I can see many of you wondering, with all the studying I have to get done, how in the world am I going to get 9 1/2 hours of sleep, let alone 8?  Time management is key.  And if you take the steps mentioned above, you most certainly will have enough time to get the necessary sleep.

If, even after applying these study tips, you still do not have time to get enough sleep, you may want to look at the number of commitments you have made.  Between sports, school, extracurriculars and social activities, it is extremely easy to take on too much.  Many students think they have to do a lot in order to get into a good college.  But what will colleges appreciate more, a student who gets average grades because she has over-extended herself or a student who excels in the few activities she has committed herself to? Here’s a hint, it’s the latter.

Bottom line: go get some ZZZ’s.

 

Brain food icon

# 8: Eat Healthy Food

brain-food.jpgNot long ago a student was preparing for her finals, and her mother, knowing that she would have a lot of studying ahead of her, put together a care package of goodies to help her get everything finished.  This act was kind on her mother’s part, but the contents were cringe worthy.  Inside were salty pretzels, chocolate muffins, candy, soda and several other junk food items.  The irony here was that though her mother was trying to help her, this care package was not at all useful.  These foods would do nothing whatsoever to give her energy and the mental strength to get through finals, in fact these foods would work against her.

Eating “brain food” is another simple way to make your study time more effective.

Check out the chart below for suggested foods and their benefits.

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Read an article about brain food here.

 

study group

#9: Form a Study Group

study group funnyMany do not discover the power of a committed study group until after High School;  however, students as young as Jr. High can find study groups valuable.  We’re not talking about a group of friends who get together for an hour, talk for half of it, take selfies for another 15 minutes, and do not get around to studying until it’s almost time to leave.

What we are referring to is a study group with committed students whose goals really are to improve their grades and do well on tests. Kids who want to goof off, talk, or not do the work should not be invited.  And if you cannot get school work done with friends, then look for other serious students in your class.

This can be helpful for a number of reasons.  First of all, discussion is a powerful tool for learning.  Also, if you are not sure about something, there are several students you can go to for help.  Between a group of minds, one of the students is most likely going to have the answer or your group can reason it out together.  Lastly, if another student is unsure, this gives you the opportunity to teach them.  When you get the chance to apply what you learn, you deepen your understanding.

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#10: Set an End Goal

Maybe, you are the type of student who knows exactly where you want to be in ten years.  Maybe you know exactly where you want to go to college.  Or maybe you are just trying to make it through the semester, so please stop talking about goals, thank you very much!  Regardless of where you are at, it is important to have objectives, whether they be short term or long term.
Star Wars Yoday GoalNot sure where you want to be in the future?  Take a few moments to reflect.  Decide what grades you want this semester.  Think about the college of your dreams.  Even go as far as what type of job you want.  Write them down.  Go back to them throughout the semester to remind yourself of what it is that you are working so hard for.

What is your motivation? What keeps you getting out of bed in the morning and going back to school every day?  All this time you are putting to school is not in vain.  You will use it down the road whether it seems like it or not.

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At the very least, school is a stepping stone to get you to where you want to get.  So when you feel overwhelmed and like you want to throw in the towel, remember your purpose for studying.  You are headed somewhere, and there is a reason for giving school your best effort.

. . .

Untitled-2We hope that this list gave you some helpful tips to study more effectively in the New Year.  Even if using just a few of these tips end up making your studying more efficient, then it was worth the effort of applying these tools.

Which one of these tips sound the most helpful?  Are there any tips not on the list that you use to study?

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© Oxford Tutoring 2015

Julia Author PicMeet the author:  Julia Myres is an ELA instructor at Oxford Tutoring who has been working with students for over 10 years.  She builds up her student’s confidence in the subjects they struggle with through encouragement and support.  Striving to make her students ready to tackle even the most difficult concepts as they move up in their education, she motivates her students to take their education into their own hands and thrive.

Contributors:

Alex Claude:  Alex Claude is an SAT and ACT ELA Director and an ELA tutor at Oxford Tutoring.  He takes the time to get to know his students so he can learn and apply how to best teach them.  Alex teaches his students how to effectively communicate through writing, and how to analyze informational texts and novels.

Jason Orens: Jason, a Math and Computer Science Instructor has been tutoring with Oxford Tutoring for over nine years.  Utilizing the student’s existing knowledge and a touch of humor, Jason strives to remove students mental barriers between themselves and the difficult, technical materials.  He combines his years of tutoring experience and expertise in the fields of Math and Computer Science to give his students the tools they need to succeed in these challenging classes.

Yuriko Lord: Yuriko is a Math and Science instructor who has been tutoring at Oxford Tutoring for over eight years.  Fully invested in her students, Yuriko sees her students through the demanding Math and Science courses, motivating her students through encouragement, accountability, and by challenging them to take their education into their own hands.  She incorporates visual and auditory tools into her tutoring method in order to best reach her student’s learning styles and educational needs.

Posted in Algebra, Calculus, Computer Science, Geometry ', Homework Help, Individualized Tutoring, K-12 Tutoring, Mathematics

Why Do I Have to Learn This? Prime Numbers

In this third entry of Oxford Tutoring’s “Why do I Have to Learn This?” series, we will explore the link between prime numbers, and their applications in the real world.

why must i learn math

Prime Numbers in School

One of the earlier distinctions students learn – as early as Grade 4 under the Common Core State Standards – is that between prime and composite numbers.  At that grade, the practice is reasonably straight-forward, involving factoring numbers into their primes using factor trees.  However, when put into practice, prime numbers stand among the most important parts of mathematics, and power important parts of our world.

Prime Numbers Power Machines

referencenumber: sopg200405 The design of new power plant turbines has a major influence on the efficiency of power generation Improving the efficiency of power plants today means battling to achieve increases of the order of one tenth of a percentage. Here the design of the turbine blades plays an important part. The high degree of precision required for their development and manufacture can only be achieved with computers. The result is good for the environment as well as for the budget of the power plant operator: an improvement of one whole percent in the efficiency of a brown-coal fuelled base load power plant unit with an output of 900 MW reduces the amount of coal used per year by 155,000 tons and the quantity of carbon dioxide emission by 150,000 tons, with the same electric output. With the present number of coal-fired power plants, a one-percent improvement in efficiency would relieve the environment of 158 million tons of carbon dioxide. The world record for a coal-fired steam turbine, 48.5 percent, is held by Siemens; for power plants in which the exhaust heat of gas turbines is used to drive steam turbines, Siemens also holds the world record of 58.4 percent. The picture shows the blades being mounted on a steam turbine at Siemens’ factory in Mühlheim. Das Design neuer Kraftwerksturbinen bestimmt maßgeblich den Wirkungsgrad der Stromerzeugung Verbesserungen des Wirkungsgrades von Kraftwerken sind heute ein Kampf um Zehntel-Prozentpunkte. Eine wichtige Rolle spielt dabei die Gestaltung der Turbinenschaufeln. Die heute bei deren Entwicklung und Fertigung erforderliche höchste Präzision lässt sich nur noch mit Unterstützung durch Computer erreichen. Das Ergebnis ist gut für die Umwelt und für das Budget der Kraftwerksbetreiber: Ein mit Braunkohle befeuerter Grundlast-Kraftwerksblock mit einer Leistung von 900 Megawatt verbraucht z. B. mit einem Plus von einem ganzen Prozentpunkt bei gleich bleibender elektrischer Leistung pro Jahr 155.000 Tonnen wenig

Diving into the technical, prime numbers, interestingly, help ensure our machines stay functioning.  Everything solid has a “natural frequency”, a frequency at which it vibrates.  These solid objects can be disrupted, damaged, or even destroyed through “resonance”, when something introduces another vibration at a particular frequency that will interact.  We may have Mythbusters, or CW’s “The Flash”, in addition to physics classes, to thank for having learned about some of these ideas; however, they left out much of the math.  As we said, primes power our world – literally!

Literally

Steam turbine shafts, for example, help generate the electricity that powers our world.  Thanks to the fact they have moving parts, they have vibrations, and these vibrations can cause trouble for the machines.  Excellent if we are expecting a Terminator-style machine uprising, not so excellent if we are expecting to keep the lights on.  However, the use of prime numbers here – in this case, the number of the fan blades on these steam turbines – means less interaction between the machinery and those vibrations… which means the power stays on for us!

Prime Numbers Keep Our Identities Safe

… All of that may not be terribly exciting for us since we don’t see it.  The lights come on when we flick the switch, they stay on, and we don’t need to worry about the mechanics.  So what’s the bottom line for prime numbers, if we don’t directly see what they do?  The answer is . . . the bottom line.  That’s right, primes are directly related to money, and specifically to online shopping.

Making a purchase through Amazon, Google Play, iTunes, or the Microsoft Store requires a credit card, and keeping that credit card number safe is nothing short of paramount these days; no one wants their credit card number floating around the internet for anyone else to use.  Primes are used to make sure that your credit card number is so obscured that no one would want to try to get it.

Prime numbers keep this . . .
Prime numbers keep this . . .
. . . from turning into this.
. . . from turning into this.

Granted, these are not the primes of elementary school (the prime numbers used easily have over a hundred digits!), but they are essential for security because these large primes make it incredibly difficult to decode.  To put it in perspective, people have tried to break some versions of this type of security, and with hundreds of supercomputers at their disposal, it took them two years to decode an encrypted message.  If you are anything like me, you are more likely to lose your credit card at home in that time than you are to have your credit card number decrypted.

Hiding Place

Prime Numbers Are Apart of Our World

Who knew that what we learned in our elementary school days could have so much impact on daily life!

Be sure to bookmark our blog for future posts in this series, as well as our other series, on what you can do to make sure you are prepared for college, study advice, and more!

Meet the author:  Jason, a Math and Computer Science Instructor has been tutoring with Oxford Tutoring for over nine years.  Utilizing the student’s existing knowledge and a touch of humor, Jason strives to remove students mental barriers between themselves and the difficult, technical materials.  He combines his years of tutoring experience and expertise in the fields of Math and Computer Science to give his students the tools they need to succeed in these challenging classes.

Email us to book us session with an Oxford Tutoring Math and Science tutor.

Or give us a call at (949) 681-0388!

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© Oxford Tutoring 2015

Posted in Algebra, Calculus, Computer Science, Education, Geometry ', Math Tutoring, Mathematics, Pre-Calculus, Statistics, Studying, Tutoring

Why do I Have to Learn this: Parabolas?

As tutors and educators, we all bring different areas of expertise and knowledge to the table.  Here at Oxford Tutoring, we can assist all varieties of learners from Kindergartners learning phonics to a Seniors in High School applying to the college of his or her dreams.  Specifically, Oxford Tutoring provides Math tutoring, English Language Arts tutoring, Science tutoring, SAT and ACT Test Prep, and more.  Suffice it to say, each of us has tutored all types of students in all types of subjects.  Despite differences in our expertise, our students, and our experiences, one thing we have almost all been asked by our students is, “Why do I have to learn this?”  A frustrated student will come across a concept like the mechanics of grammar or Algebraic functions and wonder how on earth this information could ever prove useful outside of the classroom or in their lives.  In response to this very common question, we have started a blog series that will help students apply their education to their world.

In this first entry of Oxford’ Tutoring’s “Why do I Have to Learn this?” series, we will explore the link between the math of parabolas and it’s applications in the real world.

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You can sum up the reaction I get when I tell my students that math shows up in the real world with the word incredulity.  They all have seen “application problems” in their Math books, but are unable to believe that these scenarios could be possible in the real world because it is within the context of their Math book.  However, our tutors present applications of Math to a student, one-on-one in their tutoring sessions based on what is relevant to the student. The fact that it comes from the mouth of another human, a Math tutor, takes a subject that students often find bland, and injects it with new life.

Parabolas are one of the first places that students can get a taste of where math meets the world.  Students quickly understand that a parabola (the concept usually taught in Algebra 1 and Algebra 2) is the basis for the “paraboloid,” a three-dimensional figure similar to a bowl they ate cereal out of that morning with the same focus (the fixed point inside the parabola) and axis of symmetry (the vertical line that divides the parabola into equal halves).

Parabola to Paraboloid

By making a connection between the equation of a parabola and a real world shape (the parabaloid), students are able to find the missing link between the Mathematics of the classroom and real world objects. In so doing, they can conceptualize complex concepts they might otherwise detest.  Because students do not get a taste of this in school, it has not yet sunk in the equation of parabola is the basis for the technology behind car headlamps, satellite television, internet access and optical light telescopes to name a few.  To clarify, parabolas and paraboloids have the same property – if we treat the figure as a reflective surface (essentially a mirror) two equal and opposite events can occur:

  1. Anything that comes in parallel to the axis of symmetry gets reflected to the focus
  2. Anything that comes out of the focus and gets reflected comes out parallel to the axis of symmetry

While these events seem extremely complex for a student just tackling Algebra 1 or Algebra 2, just consider the aforementioned examples and how they connect to these events:

  • Car headlamps, that allow us to drive at night (an example of event 2), function because the lightbulb sits on the focus, and the strong beam in the distance is the light coming out parallel to the axis of symmetry.

Headlamp

  • Satellite television and internet access (an example of event 1) function because the satellite in orbit is far enough away that any signal received is essentially parallel, and the receiver is at the focus point.

            Satellite Dish

  • Optical light telescopes (an example of event 1) function because of a paraboloid mirror that is a key part of the assembly, similar to that of a satellite television dish.

Telescope

Generally, after discussing and viewing a few drawings on these ideas, the students start to realize that not only is math in underlying ideas in the real world, but it is also providing students a direct benefit, be it the enjoyment they get from star gazing, the usefulness of internet access, or the safety it provides them as they drive home from a late tutoring session.  It is this realization that often spurs the student onward through difficult content and makes that content memorable and meaningful, the seed for future scientific pursuits.

Meet the author:  Jason, a Math and Computer Science Instructor has been tutoring with Oxford Tutoring for over nine years.  Utilizing the student’s existing knowledge and a touch of humor, Jason strives to remove students mental barriers between themselves and the difficult, technical materials.  He combines his years of tutoring experience and expertise in the fields of Math and Computer Science to give his students the tools they need to succeed in these challenging classes.

Email us to book us session with an Oxford Tutoring Math and Science tutor.

Or give us a call at (949) 681-0388!

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© Oxford Tutoring 2015

Posted in Algebra, Anamtoy, Biology, Calculus, Chemistry, Education, Geometry ', Math Tutoring, Mathematics, Pre-Calculus, Science Tutoring, Statistics, Studying, Tutoring

4 Tools to Study Math and Science More Effectively

Cover Science

Serena Williams is the best female tennis player in the world for a good reason.  She’s played since she was three years old and has dedicated most of her life to the sport.  Being number one doesn’t come easy; she spends long hours practicing, training, and challenging herself, desiring to perfect her craft.

Likewise, being a super star at math or science doesn’t come easy.  As a Math and Science tutor, over the years, I’ve seen students attempt to become master science and math students; some have succeeded, while others have failed.  Some may say the students who excelled were just lucky with good teachers who taught well or only gave them easy tests.  On the other hand, there are those that might suggest that the students who failed had terrible instructors who didn’t teach at all or gave them extremely difficult tests.

I won’t deny that a teacher heavily shapes a student’s understanding and outlook of a subject.  However, I also want to encourage you to take your education into your own hands (especially when you get into college where the professors don’t care if you complete your homework and your parents aren’t there to nag you).  In the long run, your success in math and science depends only on you. Take ownership and be proud of your accomplishments!

Here are some useful tools to help you master math and science:

Planner

Tool 1: Plan ahead.  Use a planner or Google Calendar.  Write down all of the dates of your Math and Science quizzes and tests and set a reminder to start studying for each quiz/test at least two weeks in advance.  Make sure to study a little bit every day (at least 30 minutes).  Preview the lesson or chapter before you learn it in class.

Practice

Tool 2: Practice and repeatDo extra practice problems every day.  Don’t rely only on your homework assignments to do problems.  Do a few extra challenging problems and check your answers to make sure you remember what you learned.  Completing a variety of Math and Science problems will also expose you to different ways a concept can be tested.  This can be really helpful because your teacher may not always give you problems on the test that are worded exactly like how they were on the homework; so you will have seen how the same concept can be tested or applied from different angles.  Keep a notebook of all of the problems you’ve done so you can study them later on.

closeup of teacher having fun and helping male student with his work

Tool 3: Ask for help.  If you get stuck on a problem or concept, don’t sweep it under the rug and wish it away.  This way of dealing with your problems will catch up with you the test.  Ask for help!  Mark what you get stuck on and ask your teacher the next day during class or office hours.  If you feel your teacher isn’t effective, ask a classmate or friend who gets it.  If neither of those avenues work, ask your parents to get you a Math or Science tutor.  I heard Oxford Tutoring has fabulous tutors! 😉

Apply

Tool 4: Apply what you learn.  Do you want to be a doctor? An engineer? A lawyer? A poet?  You can apply mathematics and sciences to all careers. Tie in these concepts to the world around you. Why do grapes taste so sweet?  Because the plants go through photosynthesis to produce sugars!  Applying what you during your education helps you remember it better and longer.

Stay classy Oxford student!

Meet the author: Yuriko is a Math and Science instructor who has been tutoring at Oxford Tutoring for over eight years.  Fully invested in her students, Yuriko sees her students through the demanding Math and Science courses, motivating her students through encouragement, accountability, and by challenging them to take their education into their own hands.  She incorporates visual and auditory tools into her tutoring method in order to best reach her student’s learning styles and educational needs.

Email us to book us session with an Oxford Tutoring Math and Science tutor.

Or give us a call at (949) 681-0388!

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© Oxford Tutoring 2015