Posted in Algebra, Child, children, classes, Courses, Parenting, STEAM, student, Studying, summer, technology, Tutoring, Tutoring Sessions, Uncategorized

Summer Courses 2017: Math Courses with Oxford Tutoring

Oxford Tutoring is offering a variety of summer courses redesigned with your schedule in mind.  Choose from math, reading & writing, enrichment courses, or ACT and SAT courses to prepare your children for the upcoming school year.

Summer Mathematics Courses

1st Grade Math

In our 1st Grade Math class, students will use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions. They will put math facts to memory and extend their understanding of number sense to complete math challenges. Request more information

2nd Grade Math

In our 2nd Grade Math class, students will add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value. Students will also hone their understanding of basic word problems and how to extract the critical information for problem-solving. They will refine math facts knowledge and extend their understanding of number sense to complete math challenges. Request more information

3rd Grade Math

In our 3rd Grade Math class, students will use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities. They will commit multiplication facts to memory and develop strategies for expressing conceptual understanding. Students will not only develop the proficiency necessary for the upcoming school year, but will also be inspired to learn through interactive, exciting projects, including game theory, wherein students engage in metacognition and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

4th Grade Math

In our 4th Grade Math class, students will find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100 and recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. They will develop procedural understanding of the algorithms for adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing multi-digit numbers and explore various ways of completing these operations. This course will prepare students for the new school year by incorporating both skill building and exciting, interactive activities designed to teach and inspire, including game theory, wherein students engage in metacognition and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

5th Grade Math

In our 5th Grade Math class, students will add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions and decimals, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value. They will develop procedural understanding of the algorithms for adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing decimals and fractions and explore various ways of completing these operations. Through this course, students will receive instruction to develop vital skills for the upcoming school year in a fun, interactive learning environment, including game theory, wherein students engage in metacognition and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

6th Grade Math

In our 6th Grade Math class, students will understand the concept of a unit rate a/b associated with a ratio and use rate language in the context of a proportional relationship. They will review algorithms for adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing decimals and fractions and set-up simple equations with a single variable. Students will build the skills necessary for their upcoming school year through fun, interactive projects designed to inspire them to learn, and be introduced to game theory, an exciting branch of mathematics that allows them to have great discussions, engage in metacognition, and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

7th Grade Math

In our 7th Grade Math class, students will apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients. They will integrate knowledge of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratios and proportions to solve two-step problems and tackle math challenges. In this course, preparation for their upcoming school will be presented in an exciting, interactive learning environment wherein they will be introduced to game theory, an exciting branch of mathematics that allows students to have great discussions, engage in metacognition, and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

8th Grade Math

In our 8th Grade Math class, students will understand that a function is a rule that assigns to each input exactly one output and how the graph of a function is the set of ordered pairs consisting of an input and the corresponding output. They will hone procedural skills for setting-up and solving equations, graphing linear equations and inequalities, and expressing conceptual understanding. Students will also develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year, while learning through interactive, fun projects, including game theory, an exciting branch of mathematics that allows students to have great discussions, engage in metacognition, and relate math to other areas of study. Request more information

Integrated Math 1 (9th-11th grades)

In our Integrated Math 1 course, students learn to analyze and compare linear models, understand congruent figures and their properties, and apply both geometry and algebra concepts to multi-step problems that challenge their thinking and ensure they have a solid grasp of the first semester of Integrated Math 1 courses at local schools. Students will develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year while learning through a mix of lecture, interactive projects, exploration and analysis, discussions, and metacognitive activities. Request more information

Integrated Math 2 (10th-12th grades)

In our Integrated Math 2 course, students explore quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; compare quadratics to linear and exponential expressions; compare rational, real, and complex numbers; and utilize conditional probability and the counting principle to ensure they have a solid grasp of the first semester of Integrated Math 2 courses at local schools. Students will develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year while learning through a mix of lecture, interactive projects, exploration and analysis, discussions, and metacognitive activities. Request more information

Integrated Math 3 (10th-12th grades)

In our Integrated Math 3 course, students deepen their understanding of probability and statistics, compare rational and radical functions, break down general triangles, and learn trigonometry and preCalculus concepts to ensure they have a solid grasp of the first semester of Integrated Math 3 courses at local schools. Students will develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year while learning through a mix of lecture, interactive projects, exploration and analysis, discussions, and metacognitive activities. Request more information

Competitive Math (9th-10th grades)

High School Competitive Mathematics builds and develops the necessary problem-solving skills and mathematical knowledge required for math competitions such as the American Mathematics Competition 10 (AMC 10). Students will apply and expand on classroom learned skills involving algebra, basic geometry, area and volume formulas, elementary number theory, and elementary probability. Each class, students will expand their problem solving abilities and apply test taking strategies to problems from past exams. Request more information

Algebra I

Students will establish a solid basis for Algebra success in the upcoming year. Students will explore exponents, radicals, equations, inequalities, quadratics, and graphing. Particularly, the class will teach students the primary concepts presented in the first semester of Algebra and expose them to more challenging topics that they will encounter during the second semester. Request more information

Geometry

Geometry students will prepare for success in the upcoming school year by learning to reason and problem solve based upon an understanding of the theorems and postulates of geometry. Students will learn to work with angles, polygons, and circles by using logic to solve problems. Particularly, students will develop mathematical reasoning skills. Request more information

Algebra 2 with Trigonometry

Students will solve and/or graph rational functions, irrational functions, matrices, logarithms, exponential growth and decay, conics, trigonometry, and other challenging topics. This course will ensure that they are well-prepared for the school year. Request more information

Pre-Calculus

Students master trigonometric functions, the unit circle, limits, graphing, complex polynomials, logarithms, conics, and exponents. Students master the first semester of Pre-Calculus with a focus on developing problem solving skills and building confidence to tackle challenging problems. Request more information

AP Calculus

In our AP Calculus course, students learn the operations and applications of limits and derivatives, related rates and curve stretching to ensure they have a solid grasp of the first semester of the AP Calculus concepts taught at local schools. Students will develop vital skills necessary for their upcoming school year while learning through a mix of lecture, projects, exploration and analysis, discussions, and metacognitive activities. Request more information

AP Statistics

Students study the first semester of AP Statistics, specifically descriptive statistics, normal distribution, linear regression, and probability. Request more information

 

Sign up for any of our Math Courses today! (949) 681-0388.

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Posted in Child, children, Education, K-12 Tutoring, Learning Activties, Parent, Parent and Child, Parent Help, Parenting, school, student, Studying, Tutoring, Uncategorized

10 Ways to Help Your Child Succeed In School

“Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.” – John Dewey

Education is a valuable tool that can set children up for a successful future.  As a result, children getting the best out of their education is vital.  So, how, as a parent, can you come alongside your children and support them in their education?  Here is a suggested list of ways to help your child succeed in school.

#1: Set Up a Morning Routine

Rushed mornings can carry over into your child’s day.  We all know that there are days when hurried mornings cannot be helped, but for the most part, establishing a morning routine will help your child’s day start off right.  Just like children benefit from a routine at school, so too can they benefit from a predictable morning.

#2: Get to Know Your Child’s Teacher

This may seem like an obvious step, but it can be easy to become preoccupied with other priorities.  However, taking the time to meet and get to know your child’s teacher will open up the lines of communication.   When concerns or questions arise, having already developed a rapport with your child’s teacher will make possibly difficult conversations a lot easier.

#3: Volunteer at School

Furthermore, getting involved at your child’s school can be helpful in your child’s success at school.  You will be directly engaged with your child’s education by volunteering for field trips, after school activities, or in class help. With your help, your child will benefit from a more meaningful school experience.

#4: Stay Positive about Education

School is hard work, and when your children are feeling overwhelmed they are going to feel like their school experience is a negative one.  What they need is an education advocate.  By focusing on the positives of education and continuing your education through schooling, reading, and other learning activities, you will show your children why education can help them go a long way in life.

#5: Read Together

Children need to be able to read fluently, comprehend what they are reading, and analyze the text in order to excel in school.  Reading together provides you with the opportunity to help develop these skills.  Read together and talk about what you are reading with your child in order to build these skills and aid him or her do well in school.

#6: Talk to Your Child

Talking to your children about their day and what is going on with them is an important step to helping your child succeed in school.  This way, you will know what is going on with their friends, schooling, and other activities.  Even if your child is in the stage where his or her answers to your questions are “fine” and “good”, at least they know that the lines of communication are open, and they can come to you when they are ready to talk.

#7: Provide a Study Space

It is extremely helpful for students to have a quite place to study and get their homework finished. This can be as simple as a desk with a few office supplies on it.  What this does is provide a focused learning environment that children can consistently go to to get their assignment done.

#8: Prioritize Study Time

Make sure that your children are studying and getting homework done before moving on to other activities like TV and video games.

#9: Continue Learning over the Summer

Ever heard of the summer slide?  This can really affect a child’s learning as studies show that children can lose a full month’s worth of school learning over the summer.  Combat this with continuing education over the summer through reading, classes, and tutoring.

#10: Hire a Tutor

This may be last on our list, but it most certainly should not be a last resort.  Tutoring is a great opportunity for your child to get ahead, catch up, build confidence, and even more.  Check out our latest blog to find out why tutoring can help your child.

Conclusion

These are just some of the many ways you can support your children in their school.  Can you think of any other ways to help your children with their education goals?

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Oxford Tutoring

(949) 681-0388

Posted in Education, school, student, Studying, Uncategorized

6 Ways to Prepare for Finals

Finals time is right around the corner.  Now is the time to start preparing.  Do not wait until the last minute to get ready.  Instead read our following list of the 6 ways to prepare for finals.

1. Plan Ahead

Many students make the mistake of studying the night before the test.  This is a mistake for a couple of reasons.  First off, the likelihood of retaining the information is significantly lowered.  If however, you study over time, you will find that remembering the information will be much easier.  Secondly, it is going to add undue stress to your studying and ultimately will affect you when it is time to take the test.  Planning to study ahead of time will give you the confidence you need to conquer your finals.

2. Create a Study Schedule

This goes hand in hand with planning ahead.  When you are prepping ahead of time, you will have the opportunity to write up a study schedule.  Spend more time on the subjects that are more difficult with you.  Also, consider switching subjects every hour or two.  This can prevent the tiring out we often experience when we spend too much time on one subject.

3. Form Study Groups

There is a great advantage to studying in groups.  This allows you to have assistance when you come across an area of the subject you struggle with or are unfamiliar with. Furthermore, you are given the opportunity to be taught and to teach – both of which are conducive to your learning the material.  So get together with a couple of friends from class to prepare for finals.

4. Take Breaks

You would be surprised how much taking a break – even just for 15 or 20 minutes – can increase your focus.  If possible, take a break every hour or so.  Eat healthy snack, grab some fresh air, or get some exercise.  This will help you come back refreshed and ready to keep studying.  Don’t watch TV, play video games, or go on social media.  These activities do very little to give your brain a rest – which is the goal of taking breaks.

5. Sleep Well

This may seem simple and obvious.  However, some students adhere to staying up all night the night before the final thinking that this will help them score higher.  There is not much evidence to back this up.  In fact, to function well your brain needs rest.  By studying ahead of time, you will be able to get to bed early the night before the finals and come to the test well-rested.  This will also decrease your chance of getting sick which can often happen to students during finals time as a result of high stress and little sleep.

6. Find a Study Partner or a Tutor

Find a friend (one that will focus and take studying seriously), grab your books, and head to the closest Starbucks for some study time.  If you find it difficult to focus when studying with a friend, consider getting a tutor to help you prepare for finals.  I hear Oxford Tutoring can help out with this.

Conclusion

Following the above steps will go a long way for improving your scores.  So start getting ready now and try the above 6 ways to prepare for finals. Call us today for a tutor who can help you get ready for finals. (949) 681.-0388.

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Posted in Book, Child, children, Education, ELA, English Language Arts Tutoring, Parent, Reading, school, student, Studying, Uncategorized

How to Annotate – Close Reading

Is it enough for students to simply comprehend their school readings? While reading comprehension is necessary for doing well in school, in order to experience success in current and future schooling, students will be required to go beyond what they see on the surface and dig deeper into the text.

This is where the process of close reading can make all the difference.  Close reading is when we slow down and think about what we are reading.  An important step in close reading is to annotate, as this allows for greater focus and attention to detail. Keep reading to learn how to annotate when you are practicing the art of close reading.

Comprehension of Key Ideas and Details

Unfamiliar Vocabulary

To help yourself determine the meaning of the vocabulary word, find context clues.  If necessary use a dictionary.

Main Ideas

Take notes on the central themes, clues or details that back up the main idea and themes.

Confusing Parts

Find unfamiliar details that you might need to clarify through re-reading, summarizing, discussion or research.

Questions to Ask

Who are the main characters?

What is the setting?

What is the main conflict?

 

 

Analyze the Text for Craft and Structure

Repeated Themes or Ideas

Think about the genre of the work and the ideas, use of language, and any lesson or moral.

Character or Author’s Feelings

For fiction, take note of how the author uses dialogue, descriptions, things the character says, does, etc. to develop character.

When it comes to non-fiction, pay attention to how the author talks about the subject to determine his or her feelings about the topic.

Note the Narrator’s Point of View

Determine how the point of view contributes to the story.

Questions to Ask

Why do characters behave as they do?

How do their actions advance the plot?

How does the author’s word choice affect the story’s tone?

 

 

Integrate Your Knowledge

Connections

Compare and contrast this work with other works you have read, information you already know, and ways in which you can relate to the story.

Deeper Meaning

Find the important images and symbols to analyze their deeper meaning.

Effective Writing

Look for literary devices, figurative language, powerful sentences, etc.

 Questions to Ask

How has this work increased my knowledge of a subject or author?

What is surprising about the story’s outcome?

What did I appreciate about the author’s style?

 

 

Tools for Annotation

Make your annotation system your own, use colored pens, highlighters or symbols to annotate for the above list of items.

This process of annotation will help you read more closely and allow you to dig deeper to find more significance in the texts you are reading.  This will not only provide more depth to your schooling, but will also be an influence on your life. ­­­­­­

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Posted in ACT, Education, Individualized Tutoring, SAT, SAT Test Prep, student, Studying, Uncategorized

ACT vs. SAT Reading Passages

There are many factors that can help a student determine which test they should take – the ACT or the SAT. Variables such as strengths, weaknesses, timing, or style can all play a role in making this important decision.

Perhaps you are a student who feels confident in your math skills, so you can handle whatever math questions these tests throw at you.  However, your reading is an area in which you could use some additional help.  The reading passages will be the issue that justifies your choice.

If that is the case then this post should prove beneficial.  We are going to breakdown the differences between the ACT and SAT reading passages in order to help you make the difficult decision of which test is the right test for you.

Number of Passages

The SAT has 5 reading passages while the ACT has 4 reading passages.

 

Number of Questions

Every test you take for the ACT will have a total of 40 questions with 10 questions per passage.

While overall, the SAT will always have 52 questions, the amount of questions per passage will vary.

 

Timing

How much time will you have to tackle the reading passages?

Overall, for the SAT you will have 65 minutes, which breaks down to 13 minutes per passage.

You will have 35 minutes for the ACT passage, which means 8 minutes and 24 seconds per passage.

 

Passage Types

On the ACT, the reading passages will include one of each of the following: Prose Fiction, Social Science, Humanities, and Natural Science.   The Social Science and Natural Science passages tend to be more straightforward, and therefore less challenging.  While the Humanities and Prose Fiction passages require more analysis which lends towards more difficulty when reading these passages.  On occasion, one of these reading passages will be a paired passage.

On the SAT, the reading passages have one Literature passage, one History passage, one Social Studies passage (economics, Sociology, Psychology or another Social Studies passage), and two Science passages (there is a possibility that one of them will be a paired passage).  The difficulty level varies and very much depends on your familiarity with the subject and the complexity of the topic.

 

Question Types

The question types on the ACT will be the following: detail, words in context, generalization, cause and effect, inference, main idea, point of view, and except questions.

For the SAT, expect these question types: evidence, arguments, words in context, and synthesis (questions based on analyzing a graph).

 

Style

For the most part the reading passages you encounter on the ACT test are going to be more about what is actually in the passage.  However, this does mean that the reading passages in the ACT are going to be a little drier.

On the SAT test, the reading passages discuss more interesting topics.  But it will require that you dig deeper and analyze the passage for what the author is attempting to say rather than just what he is saying.

 

Challenge

The challenge with the ACT is time.  While the questions are more straightforward and the passages are more direct than the SAT test, you have significantly less time to read and answer the questions.  So if you struggle to read quickly, consider trying the SAT.

The struggle with the SAT is the level of critical thinking skills required to answer the reading passage questions.  If analysis is something that you find to be tough, try a practice ACT first to see if it fits your strengths.

 

Conclusion

Overall, both present their own unique set of challenges.  It really comes down to what type of student you are and an awareness of your strengths and weaknesses.

Still not sure which test is for you?  Sign up for a diagnostic SAT and ACT test to get a breakdown of your score.  We will even set up a consultation with our SAT and ACT experts to help you figure out which test is the best fit for you.

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Posted in ACT, Education, SAT, SAT Test Prep, student, Studying, Tests, Uncategorized

How to Overcome ACT and SAT Test Anxiety

There is no doubt about it – the SAT test and ACT test are difficult tests.  For many students, the idea of taking such challenging tests can fill them with dread and anxiety.  Because these tests are created to predict how well students will do in college, mountains of pressure are associated with the ACT and SAT.  Even extremely bright students are often frozen in fear when facing these giants.  Text anxiety is a very real struggle for many of our students. At Oxford Tutoring, we believe in not only preparing our students for the test as far as content and strategy goes, but also in helping them overcome their fear by giving them the confidence to tackle the ACT and the SAT.  Here are some Oxford Tutoring recommended steps to overcome ACT and SAT test anxiety.

Breathe

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It may seem simple enough – breathing is something we do without thinking about it.  But that is not the type of breathing we are referring to here.  We are talking about deep breathing.  The kind that, according Denise Scarbro, fitness and nutrition guru with a BA in Psychology, says, “The parasympathetic nervous system is what controls our fight or flight response. Deep breathing triggers our parasympathetic nervous system, neutralizes stress and elicits a calming feeling.” (Source).

The technique we recommend is something we call the 5-2-5.  For five seconds, breathe in deeply through your nose, hold the breath for 2 seconds, then exhale through your mouth for five seconds.  Do this several times at the start of your test, when you are practicing, or when you are feeling overwhelmed to calm you anxiety and relax your mind.

Still feeling stressed? It may be because you are breathing from your chest and not your stomach.  Place your hand on your stomach when breathing to ensure that you are breathing from the proper place to experience the full benefits of the 5-2-5 deep breathing exercise.

 

Practice

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Another basic but often overlooked concept it practicing.  Theses tests is beasts – they are almost 4 hours long.  Think back to the last activity you did that lasted for four hours straight.  Can’t think of one? That is because four hours is very long time for your brain to be focusing on one activity.  It is not natural and not what students are used to.  An hour test? Sure.  Maybe even two hours.  But four! That is gonna require some work.

Which is where practice comes in.  Just like in a basketball game, coaches cannot expect their players to be able to run for an hour or more without preparing them for it.  So players practice and build up their stamina. It is the same thing for the ACT or SAT.  You can take a test for four hours, you just have to build up the stamina.  So take practice tests in a setting like that of the one you will be taking the ACT or SAT in.  If you need a place to practice, Oxford Tutoring offers practice tests to help you conquer the ACT test or SAT test.

 

Prepare Ahead of Time

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Nothing will cause panic quite like feeling unprepared.  If you have not put the time and effort into getting ready for the test, then fear is a completely expected reaction.  Things are a lot scarier when you haven’t trained to face them.

So yes, you need to practice.  But you also need to give yourself enough time so that the practice will be a benefit to you.  Practicing the night before is not going to give you the confidence you need to take the test.  So start preparing.  That way you can walk into the room on test day and know exactly what type of animal you are facing and how to take it down.

 

Give Yourself Some Grace

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This is a hard test.  You are being asked to do college-level analysis and college-level math.  It is no joke.  Furthermore, most high schools do not have the time to prepare you with the type of knowledge you will need to have to take the ACT and SAT.  So, do yourself a favor, don’t expect perfection right off the bat.  It is like a marathon, not a sprint.  Taking our practice tests once or twice is not enough to get to the finish line.   It takes consistent practice, hard work, and time.  Show yourself some grace, you will not get there overnight, but if you understand that improvement is going to take time and are willing to put in the hours, you will get there.

 

Take the Test with Confidence

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You’ve prepared, you’ve practiced, you’ve put in the time, and you even have your handy-dandy breathing technique.  Now take the test with confidence!  You have got this.  You are ready.  Believe that.  We are rooting for you!

Need practice tests, private tutoring, or courses to get ready for the ACT or SAT?  Oxford Tutoring is here to help!  Call us today! (949) 681-0388.

 

Posted in ACT, Child, classes, College Planning, Courses, Education, Homework Help, Individualized Tutoring, K-12 Tutoring, New SAT, SAT, SAT Test Prep, Studying, Uncategorized

6 Steps to Prepare for the SAT

The dreaded SAT: a challenge that all high school student with dreams of going to college must face.  Success on this test begins with understanding the SAT test and facing it with courage and determination. In the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, an American politician, diplomat, and activist, “You must do the thing which you think you cannot do.”  The SAT may seem like a test too big to tackle, with some basic, manageable steps, you will find yourself on the way to not only taking the SAT, but conquering it.

 

Step #1 – Select an SAT Date.  Register!

It may seem like common sense, but with so many other activities, sports, classes, and studying, it is easy to let SAT test dates slip by without registering.  So, stop what you are doing right now.  Pick a test date, and go register here .

SAT Test Dates

The SAT test is offered a number of times during the school year.   Tests are offered on Saturdays.  Be sure to select a test date that you can feasibly prepare for. Be sure to take your other obligations into consideration, like finals, AP exams, sports tournaments, college applications, etc.

 

Step #2 – Set Score Goals.

It is important to set a goal for yourself.  That way you have a score that both you and your Oxford Tutoring SAT instructor are working towards.  This helps you develop a realistic expectation and provides motivation for you to do your best.  If you need help setting an SAT score goal, meet with an Oxford Tutoring SAT Counselor for free.

 

Step #3 – Track your progress.

Use the following chart to keep track of how you are doing.  That way, you can see where you started, take note of the areas that are still causing your trouble, and decide which subjects you want to continue tutoring in.

Track Progress

Step #4 – Study! Go to class, take practice tests, and do your homework.

While practice is helpful, practice does not make perfect if you are practicing incorrectly.  That’s where Oxford Tutoring comes in, with classes that cover content, teach strategies, and prepare you to achieve your SAT score goals.

Furthermore, when it comes to studying, treat the SAT like eating your vegetable.  Eating a few vegetables a day is manageable, helpful, and even good.  Studying is the same way.  Studying everyday is much more manageable and effective than trying to do it all at once.

Don’t try to do a week’s worth of studying in one day, just as you would not eat a week’s worth of vegetables in one day.  You will be healthier, smarter, and happier with consistent study.  And your SAT score will thank you! Consistent study builds long-term memory.

Step #5 – Focus extra study time on trouble spots.

Spend extra time on those areas that you are still struggling with.  This is especially helpful for critical reading and essay writing.

The following texts have been used by the SAT to construct SAT reading passages.  Thus, these readings are your best choice for practice of the reading passages.

Literature and Personal Narratives

U.S. Founding Documents (the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Federalist Papers.

The Great Global Conversation (Edmund Burke, Henry David Thoreau, Gandhi, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Martin Luther King Jr.

A speech delivered by Congresswoman Barbara Jordan of Texas on July 25, 1974, as a member of the Judiciary Committee of the United States House of Representatives.

Federalist No. 65, an essay by Alexander Hamilton

Richard Florida, The Great Reset

Social Science and Physical Science

Economics, Psychology or Sociology resources

Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, or Physics resources

Step #6 – Succeed! Take the test with confidence!

Oxford Tutoring comes alongside you to help you achieve your SAT goals.  Sign up for an SAT or ACT test prep course today! (949) 681-0388.

If you follow these steps, you will be well on your way to conquering the SAT and achieving your score goal.  Don’t forget, Oxford Tutoring is here to help offering SAT classes that come with a score guarantee and SAT private tutoring.  Call us today to schedule a free SAT Consult to learn more!

 

 

 

Posted in ACT, Education, grammar, SAT, SAT Test Prep, Studying, Uncategorized, Writing

Top 10 Grammar Basics to Master Before Taking the ACT or SAT

10 Grammar Basics to Master Before Taking the ACT and SATBasic grammar may seem like common knowledge to students in the 10th – 12th grades.  However, it might surprise you to know that many of our high school students come to us having not reviewed their beginning grammar since elementary school.  That is why our English ACT or SAT preparation always starts with a basic grammar review before moving onto the more complex grammar concepts found in the ACT and SAT.  Often, it is not that our students do not understand grammar, but simply they do not remember it.  So we wanted to give you a head start.  If you come to our ACT and SAT private tutoring or ACT and SAT courses with this basic knowledge in your back pocket, you will be ready to move on to the more advanced grammar concepts from the ACT or SAT.

#1 – Nouns

Definition – person, place, thing, or idea.

Examples –  boy, Denmark, desk, happiness.

In a Sentence – She showed great courage when faced with the death of her husband.

 

#2 – Pronouns

Definition – takes the place of a noun

Examples – she, who, anyone, his

In a Sentence – After Marie won the tennis tournament, she thanked her coach and her parents.

 

#3 – Verbs

Definition –  1. action or helping; 2. linking (state of being) “to”

Examples – ran, am, been working

In a Sentence – Elyse is training for a marathon; she wants to race in six months.

 

#4 – Adjectives

Definition – modifies a noun or pronoun; answers the questions “Which one?”; “What kind?”; “How many?”

Examples – warm, disgusting, angry

In a Sentence – The large dog with the shaggy coat played with the three rambunctious children.

 

#5 – Adverbs

Definition – modifies a verb, adjective, or adverb; answers the questions “How?”; “When?”; “Where?”; “Why?”

Examples – excitedly, momentarily, noticeably

In a Sentence – My lovely cat usually sleeps quietly on the kitchen table.

 

# 6 – Prepositions

Definition – shows the relationship between two nouns, usually location or direction; always comes with a phrase

Examples – in, over, under

In a Sentence- I ran barefoot through the soccer field and stepped on a cleat.

 

#7 – Conjunctions

Coordinating

Definition – connected related words, phrases, or clauses

Examples – for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so

In a Sentence – Marc likes to eat, but he doesn’t like to exercise.

 

Correlative

Definition – comes in pairs

Examples – neither…nor, either…or

In a Sentence – I want not only a bike but also a coat for my birthday.

 

Subordinating 

Definition – creates a dependent clause

Examples – since, because, as

In a SentenceAlthough Paulina wants to go with us to the game, she has to finish her homework.

 

#8 – Infinitives

 

Definition – to + verb; acts like a noun

Examples – to jump, to try, to act

In a Sentence – Paulina to go with us to the game.

 

#9 – Gerunds

Definition – verb + ing; acts like a noun

Examples – skating, yelling, crying

In a SentenceHiking and running are my favorite activities.

 

#10 – Participle

Past

Definition– verb + ed

 

Present

Definition – verb + ing

Acts like an adjective

Example – aged, dancing

In a Sentence – While tying her running shoes, Rita sat on a broken chair.

 

Understanding basic grammar goes a long way in preparing you for the ACT and SAT.  So if you have not done so yet, make sure you have a thorough understanding of the above list.  Then come down to Oxford Tutoring and sign up for an ACT or SAT class or a ACT or SAT private tutoring session.  Sign up today! (949) 681-0388.

 

Posted in Education, ELA, English Language Arts Tutoring, essay, Homework Help, Individualized Tutoring, K-12 Tutoring, student, Studying, teacher, Tutoring, Tutoring Sessions, Uncategorized, Writer's Block, Writing, Writing Tools

Elements of an Essay: Conclusion Paragraphs

For the last several weeks, we have broken down the format of an essay into easy to understand parts.  There is a basic formula for writing a well-structured essay.  Ultimately, it is the writer’s job to plug their words into the formula effectively and correctly.

However, having the tools to put an essay together in an organized manner can go a very long way to writing a successful essay.

Structure is one of the key elements in essay writing, and with the conclusion of today’s blog, you will have all the elements needed to present a well-structured essay.

Speaking of conclusions, today we are going to look at conclusion paragraphs.  As a reminder, let’s briefly look at all the components  of an essay.

The introduction paragraph is the heart.

It is designed to catch my reader’s attention.

Next, the thesis statement is the glue.

It holds my entire paper together and is placed at the end of introduction paragraph.

The body paragraphs are the meat.

They are the largest portion of my essay.

Then, the details of my body paragraphs are the key.

They unlock my argument.

Also, the commentary is the treasure.

They make the paper shine.

Lastly, the conclusion paragraph is the bow.

It ties my whole essay together.

 

Since the conclusion paragraph wraps everything up, we need to learn how to write one well.

Let’s take a look.

Your conclusion paragraph is your chance to remind the reader of your thesis, points you made in your body paragraphs, and leave the reader with a powerful closing statement. It should be made up of three parts.

Restatement

 

Use different words to remind the reader of your thesis statement.

 

Recap

 

Remind the reader of the main points from each of the body paragraphs.

 

So What

Your last sentence of your paragraph should be powerful. It tells the reader why they should care about your essay.

How to Write a “So What” Sentence

Your “So What” sentence will change based on the type of essay you are writing.

Informative Essays

Consider writing an objective truth.

If your paper was an informative essay on the devastation of the Black Plague, your sentence could look like this:

As society continues to develop and grow, it is necessary to remember that maintaining health standards is just as important now as it was in the 14th century.

Persuasive Essays

If your essay was persuasive, try writing a call to action.

For instance, if you were writing a persuasive paper on how Peeta is better for Katniss than Gale, your last sentence could look like this.

Show your support for Peeta by liking the Facebook page “Team Peeta.”

 

Analysis Essays

Write an expression of why your analysis improves the reading the text.

For example, if you are writing about how Fitzgerald develops Daisy’s character, your last sentence could look like this:

Fitzgerald allows the reader to see different sides of Daisy in order to create sympathy for a character who might otherwise seem thoughtless and unkind.

 

Your conclusion paragraph is the last thought your reader will be left with. So, it is important to make the conclusion powerful.

Now, we suggest you put your own essay together based on the elements of an essay that we have discussed.

Then check back in with us next week for proofreading.

 

As always, give us a call if you need help with essay writing.

(949) 681-0388.

Posted in ACT, College Admissions, College Planning, Courses, Education, Homework Help, Individualized Tutoring, K-12 Tutoring, New SAT, Orange County, Private Tutoring, SAT, SAT Test Prep, student, Studying, summer, Tests, Tutoring, Tutoring Sessions, Uncategorized

Summer Courses 2016: College Prep Courses

How are your children going to be spending their summer?

Summer is a great time to get ahead for the next year’s courses or to catch up from the previous school year.  Instead of your children wasting their summer playing video games, spend the summer hours productively, building their skills and preparing for the challenges of the next year.

Find a balance between vacation and edification to truly bask in all summer has to offer!  In Oxford’s summer courses,

  • Maintain or Build your child’s skills in Math, Science, Reading or Writing;
  • Explore a new skill such as Speech and Debate, Python Programming or Web Design;
  • Discover the joy of hands-on learning with Science Explorers or Build-a-Computer courses;
  • Ensure your child completes Required Summer Reading; OR
  • Prepare for college entrance with Essay Writing, and SAT or ACT
  • And much more….

Let’s take a look at the College Prep Courses we will be offering this summer.

For a complete schedule click here.

College Prep

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Designed for students entering the course or seeking to explore the field, these courses focus on essential concepts in a hands-on, exploratory manner

High Stakes Writing (grades 10-12): In this course, students learn how to write memorable and commanding personal and timed essays.  Session 1 focuses on SAT and ACT essays, while session 2 focuses on personal statements for college applications.

PSAT (grades 8-10): Students in 8th-10th grades should begin preparing for the newly formatted SAT. The materials and pacing of instruction are designed to build on classroom studies, providing extended instruction at the SAT level.

SAT and ACT (grades 11-12): Oxford SAT and ACT courses are demanding programs for high school juniors and seniors committed to raising their scores over the summer.

The Magna course is designed for students of all levels and guarantees a significant score improvement, typically 200 points for the SAT and 4 for the ACT.  Classes are small and students are provided with 2 private tutoring vouchers for individual sessions in addition to the weekly classes and testing.  The 8-week summer schedule (below) is followed by a fall extension of weekly testing and a 6-hour Crash Course review prior to the student’s selected test date.

The Summa course is designed for highly motivated students of advanced levels and guarantees a top score, typically 1400 or more for the SAT and 30 or more for the ACT.  Classes are small and students are provided with 4 private tutoring vouchers for individual sessions in addition to the weekly classes and testing.  The 8-week summer schedule (below) is followed by a fall extension of weekly testing and a 6-hour Crash Course review prior to the student’s selected test date.

Enrolled students interested in additional sessions in a private tutoring setting may purchase sessions at a discounted rate.

Enroll for a summer course by May 15 and get 15% off!

Refer a friend and you each will receive 25% off the course fee.

Check back with us next week to learn more about our Summer Enrichment Courses!

Call us today to enroll in our summer courses! (949) 681-0388