Posted in college, College Admissions, College Planning, Education, student, Uncategorized

College Consulting and Readiness Services with Oxford Tutoring

With college applications due in November, it is important to make sure that you are presenting your best self to the college of your dreams. This where Oxford Tutoring can help!  We have helped our students get into UCLA, UCI, USC, UC Berkley, UCSD, UCB and more.  Come receive college consulting services in any of the following areas:

Planning

This is an ideal stage for 8th grade and up.  With competition for top colleges as fierce as they are, it is never too early to start planning your high school pathway.  This includes assistance in deciding which high school classes to take, what extracurricular activities to participate in, and what volunteer work to choose.

Advising

Once you are on the college-bound road, there are difficult decisions that crop up along the way.  For example, if you are struggling with an AP class and do not believe you are going to pass the test, should you drop it or stick it out?  This is where our college consulting services can help.  Receive advising for GPA management, course evaluation, and difficult decisions.

Applying

The application is your introduction, the first impression you make on your application reader.  And we all know that first impressions are hard to change, which is why it is imperative that your application makes you shine.  We can help with UC and private school applications, determine essential content that needs to be included, and address any lapses or gaps in your application.

Writing

Many tutoring centers can help you write a personal statement that is well-written and grammatically correct, but this is only part of the requirement.  The most important job of your personal statements is to make sure that your writing matches up with the self you presented in the application.  At Oxford Tutoring, our college consulting services can help you do just that with personal statement help, making sure you engage the reader, and then crafting a polished essay.

Our College Consultant

Bob Oxford PicOur college consultant, Bob Trudeau, is one of a kind, as an application reader for UCLA and UCI, he offers a vital perspective on college applications.  Furthermore, he has more than twenty-five years of teaching experience and understands how college admissions officers read and score student applications.

By applying his knowledge of the 2,000 plus applications he scores each year with his skills in writing and grammar, Bob can help each student present him or herself as vividly and professionally as possible. Additionally, he also helps mom and dad make the tough planning and advising decisions necessary to excel academically.

Having earned his Bachelor’s degree in English and with a teaching credential from UCI, Bob is also qualified to tutor all high school English courses, high school Spanish, ACT and SAT English, and high school history.

Want to Learn More?

Attend our informational sessions “Coffee, Cookies, and College.”

These sessions, led by Bob Trudeau, discuss what college admission officers are looking for and how to plan for your high school pathway.

Bob details what it takes to be a competitive college applicant and stand out from the crowd.

Sessions will be held on the following dates:

October 4th of 6th @ 7:00 pm

Novemeber 1st or 3rd @ 7:00 pm

February 7th or 9th @7:00 pm

March 7th or 9th @ 7:00 pm

Call us today to sign up for “Coffee, Cookies, and College” or receive college consulting services. (949) 681-0388.

Posted in children, Events, family, Orange County Events, Uncategorized

OC Events: Redwood Hike

File:Sequoia sempervirens Big Basin Redwoods State Park 4.jpg

Join the OC Parks staff every first Saturday of the month for a light 1 mile hike to see the Coastal Redwood grove.  This interactive hike will encourage children to use their 5 senses and allow them to learn about other native plants as they walk along the trail.

Carbon Canyon Regional Park

1st Saturday of Every Month

Recommended for ages 3-17

Admission is free; parking is $5

Posted in ACT, Education, English Language Arts Tutoring, Individualized Tutoring, K-12 Tutoring, Private Tutoring, student, Tutoring, Tutoring Sessions, Uncategorized

The Power of “We” – Tutoring Stories

by Julia M. – tutor at Oxford Tutoring

She sat across from me, completely defeated.  Tears slipping through the cracks of her calm demeanor.

When I first began tutoring her, she wanted to study the writing section of the ACT, and she wanted to study it at rapid speed.  She is a visual learner, so once she viewed the standards of grammar she needed to know, it was imprinted in her memory, utilized easily when she answered questions.  We whizzed through that section, my voice relaying information at the speed of an auctioneer just to keep up with her alert, competent mind.

Approaching the reading section I anticipated more of the same.

Yet, I quickly learned that she is a perfectionist. Hard on herself in school, sports, and life.  She demands a lot of herself.  I admire her work ethic and willingness to push herself in order to complete her goals, however, in this case, her high expectations were holding her back.  She could not finish the reading section in a timely manner, while still maintaining respectable marks.  The ACT is a test that requires students to think critically, move quickly, and work efficiently. In a desire to do well right away, she overwhelmed herself, not realizing that it takes time to build up the stamina and skill necessary to complete this task well.

It was my job to show her.

I spent much of the weekend thinking of a way to reach this sweet, intelligent girl.  I wanted her to feel bolstered and help her to realize that with time, she would be able to master the reading passages.  I had tried to explain this to her on our last session, but her emotional state made it impossible for her to process any new information.  She was simply too entrenched by discouragement to hear me.

I needed to find the words to reach her.

Then, I remembered a few years back when I was going through a particularly difficult situation, disappointment encircled me in the same manner.  A friend of mine was helping me through this challenge.  I will never forget what she said to me as I sat across from her feeling defeated.  She said, “Julia, we are going to get through this together.”  We.  She said we.  That meant that I was not alone in my troubles.  I had someone supporting me and with her help I would be able to make it through to the other side.

Remembering this pivotal moment, I realized that this is exactly what my student needed.

At our next tutoring session, I hoped that these same words would bring the comfort to my student that they had brought to me.  Calling upon the student’s background as a gymnast, I asked how she knew when she was ready to attempt a new move.  She explained that her coach served as her spotter, teaching a new technique and not letting go until the coach was certain her gymnast could handle the new move on her own.

After hearing her response, I looked at her and explained that, just like in gymnastics, the ACT required time and practice in order to be able to master it.  And, I was going to be her spotter.  We were going to work on the new techniques together, and I was not going to let go of her until I was positive she could handle the ACT on her own.  I paused, trying to read her expression to see if I was getting through to her.  Her mind was busy processing; she stayed silent.

“You know,” I added, “We are going to get through this together.” She breathed.  Her shoulders relaxed.  She sighed, relieved, “Okay, good!”

Ahead we moved, student and tutor together.

Meet the author:  Julia M. is an ELA instructor at Oxford Tutoring who has been working with students for over 10 years.  She builds up her student’s confidence in the subjects they struggle with through encouragement and support.  Striving to make her students ready to tackle even the most difficult concepts as they move up in their education, she motivates her students to take their education into their own hands and thrive.

Posted in children, Events, family, Orange County Events, Uncategorized

OC Events: Pumpkin Patch

With Fall right around the corner, now is a great time to start planning fun family activities for the upcoming Holiday Season.  Starting, of course, with Halloween.

Beginning September 29th, Tanaka Farms in Irvine is hosting a Pumpkin Patch!  Complete with wagon rides, a corn maze, petting zoo, carnival games, food and more this event is sure to be an enjoyable time for families and kids of all ages. Check it out this fall!

September 29 – October 31

Recommended for all ages

Tanaka Farms

Admission is $2

Learn More

 

 

Posted in Education, English Language Arts Tutoring, Reading, Tutoring, Uncategorized, Writing, Writing Tools

How to Truly Understand a Text – The Reading Process

by Justin L. – Tutor at Oxford Tutoring

Reading is one of the most deceptively challenging skills to master. Once you’ve learned how to sound out words, it can feel like riding a bike downhill. You coast on momentum until coming to a stop at the bottom. You push your line of vision across the page until coming to a stop at the end.

Except, there’s more to riding a bike than balancing and pedaling, and there’s more to reading than sounding out words and scanning pages. You have to know your destination and how and why you made it there.

To learn how to read properly, you must understand the goal, the tools, and the process.

 

Goals

The #1 mistake people make when reading is approaching a text with the wrong mindset. They are looking to react to or critique what is presented. Reactions and critiques are valuable, but they are an entirely different process that follows reading. In fact, they are dependent on it.

To understand the goal of reading, you have to understand the goal of writing. Every writer wants to change your mind. That desire is not as nefarious or complicated as it sounds. While a lawyer, politician, or philosophy may pen a composition to change your opinions or actions, a screenwriter, playwright, or novelist crafts a story to entertain you. Still, either end requires the same means–your mind has to change. How? By communicating new information to you.

Thus, your goal as a reader is to understand what is being communicated to you. How? By knowing the tools the writer has at his disposal.

 

Tools

The basic tool of the writer is the word. However, like the process of reading, the word is not as simple as it seems. It is more than a collection of sounds. It is a symbol. What does it symbolize?

Every word represents a concept you hold in your mind (or will hold if you’ve never heard the word before). Concepts are placeholders in your mind for either concretes or abstracts. A concrete is an observable (by the five senses) thing. An abstract is an idea or emotion.

For example, the word “tree” symbolizes the large amount of observable traits of trees in the world. When you read it, you think of all the important traits of trees summed up in one image or “concept.” Additionally, the word “love” symbolizes the idea or emotion that can only be believed or experienced. When you read it, you think of all of the different ways to understand or feel love in one “concept.”

Thus, a writer uses symbols to make you think of the world in a specific way in order to show you new parts of it, or information, that will change your concepts.

 

The Process

The challenge of reading, then, is to understand all of the information being presented to you and how it is both different and the same as the information you already have. To do so, you must use a process similar to the Scientific Method.

Every writer has one Overall piece of information he is trying to communicate to you–usually called the Main Idea, Point, Argument, or Theme. Once you figure it out, it becomes your Touchstone or Key to understanding everything else the writer shows you in that same piece of writing. The challenge is that you’re shown everything else first and can’t be sure of the Overall until you’ve read it all (and sometimes even after you’ve finished).

Ask a Question

Before you even consume a word, you have to decide which of the almost-infinite amount of books to pick up. If you’re completing an assignment for school or work, that decision is made for you, but your work on this step isn’t complete. You have to understand why you are reading what you’re reading. How does the text reflect your (or your teacher’s or company’s) values, interests, beliefs, tastes, and goals? Once you understand the context of your efforts, you can open the cover.

Research

With a book or essay in front of you, it can be easy to flip to page one or find the first paragraph and start pressing forward. If you do so, however, you’ll miss out on a lot of important information. Gather all the background information you can to have an idea what the text is about.

Ask yourself: What is the title? Who is the author? When did he write the text? What content does it contain? How long is it? What type of sections and how many, if any, is the text divided into? Also, make sure you didn’t miss gathering any general information about the book’s subject when completing the previous step. (Ex: If the book is about architecture, learn about the basic purposes, principles, and people of architecture). The answer to all of these questions provide you all the information you need to complete the next step.

Hypothesize

This step is where using the scientific method to read becomes really important. Based on all of your knowledge of the book and the subject, come up with a proposed Main Idea, Point, Argument, or Theme of the text. This proposed Overall piece of information will be the umbrella you try to fit every other piece of information you learn while reading into. It is the starting point that you will slowly craft into your end point over the course of your consumption of the text.

Experiment + Analyze

In sciences, this step is divided in two. Reading, however, has a much less clearly defined line between the physical task (experimentation) and the reflection on it (analysis). In fact, that experimentation and analysis often occur at the same time is what makes reading so challenging. In a science experiment, you set up the physical process, run it, and collect the data. It is only then, when the physical process is complete, that you analyze the data to determine its significance.

When reading, you are collecting data and analyzing it at the same time. As you consume each new word, sentence, paragraph, and chapter, you try to fit it into your hypothesis. If you can explain how it fits into your hypothesis, you can move on. If not, you must change your hypothesis or create a new one. Thus, there are two important guidelines to follow for this step:

  1. Your hypothesis is always in flux until you finish the text. Until you have all the data, you can’t have a complete conclusion. However, as you read more and more of the text, your hypothesis should change less and less.
  2. Set up checkpoints for yourself to stop consuming new data and think about the data you have. Typically these checkpoints are the ends of sections or chapters, as the author included those breaks to signal the information because it is a data subset.

Basically, once you read the first word of the text, you enter into a loop of Experiment + Analysis and Hypothesis until you read the last word of the text.

Conclusion

Now that you have all the data and have finished looping, you should have a hypothesis that explains why the author included everything in the text. The key here is being able to explain the hypothesis and how it explains everything. To do so, write a one sentence summary of what you think the Main Idea, Point, Argument, or Theme is. This sentence serves as your shorthand for the text. Any time anyone brings up anything about the text, you refer back to your conclusion and use it as the foundation of any thinking you do. (Keep in mind, if anyone presents you with new information you may have missed when you read the text or a new understanding you may have not thought of, you may have to re-enter the loop.)

The End.png

Right now you may feel overwhelmed and discouraged by the challenge that reading presents. You may not want to put in so much effort every time you read, especially if it is “just for enjoyment.” It’s important to remember that just as everyone who learns how to ride a bike isn’t going to become a professional BMXer and medal in the X-Games, not everyone who learns how to read is going to become a Shakespearean scholar and earn a PhD in Literature. Still, just as riding a bike well can add to your life immensely, so can reading.

Truly understanding the Main Idea, Point, Argument, or Theme of a book can greatly increase your enjoyment of it. By knowing why everything was included, the importance of each line of dialogue and event becomes clear and impacts you more. Likewise, comprehending what the author is showing you can improve your life by helping you to consider complexities of life that you may never have before. Or, if you’re assigned the book for school or work, it can help you earn a good grade or complete your project perfectly.

Understand?


About the Author:
Our Oxford Tutoring, Justin L., tutors Middle School through High School English Language Arts, as well as SAT and ACT English.  As a published writer and former college English teacher, Justin has extensive knowledge of the reading and writing process. He uses his knowledge to challenge his students to think critically, encouraging them to go deeper with the texts they read and the essays they write.

Posted in children, Education, K-12 Tutoring, Tutoring, Tutoring Sessions, Uncategorized, website design

The Light in Their Eyes – Tutoring Stories

by Nuria T. – ELA, Graphic Design, Math, and Social Studies Tutor at Oxford Tutoring

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At Oxford Tutoring, there are many different types of students. Some students who are advanced, some in the middle, or others who just need a helping hand. Regardless, one thing has always been the same: when students finally grasp an unknown concept, their faces light up!

This summer I began to teach website design. The subject is in my area of studies, and I was looking forward to getting the opportunity to teach it.  I spent time writing the curriculum and doing extensive research on new program updates. I was greatly looking forward to putting all of my efforts into application and having the opportunity to teach the class.

When the class started, I noticed that even though my student did not want to pursue a career in the area of website design, she was still interested in the material. She asked as many questions as she could, gobbling up the information I presented. What impressed me the most is even though there were moments where she was having a hard time, my student would often ask if she could try it out on her own before my stepping in to help.

We went over Photoshop and Dreamweaver.  To learn two programs in four weeks is not easy on any student.  The student picked up Photoshop relatively easily, but Dreamweaver proved to be more challenging for her.  This is because the program has a very different interface. She often would ask me for “hints” when attempting to work with this program. Even though she struggled in class, she never failed to turn in the homework I assigned.  Not only would she complete what I assigned, but would also work on extra work that she assigned herself. When I asked her why this was the case she simply stated, “It looks so cool when you do it! I want to try too!”  As an tutor, it’s always fantastic to see and hear your students desiring to learn more.

The last class was my proudest moment. My student admitted that she was slightly overwhelmed, but was ready to learn the final steps. For the quiz I gave her thirty minutes to design one page of her website. She sighed but she told me not to help her throughout the quiz no matter what! I knew that she would succeed and agreed to let her handle it all on her own. And she did it! Not only did she complete the quiz, but even excelled at various font changes, DIV boxes, DIV color changes, margin spacing, padding spacing, navigation, links, and creating a footer.

The student proved that although there may have been many difficult moments, it was still worth it to try. Students often think that when an instructor assigns a harder task it’s for no reason. That’s not the case; a tutor challenges a student because he or she is confident that the student can rise to meet the challenge.

At Oxford Tutoring, when a student and tutor come together striving to learn, the sky is the limit.

Posted in Child, children, Education, Parent and Child, Tutoring, Uncategorized

Sometimes Great Things Come in Small Packages – Tutoring Stories

by Kathy H – tutor of ELA, Math, Social Studies, History, and Speech and Debate

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His name is Emmanuel, and he is a force to be reckoned with.

He is a cherubic, bespectacled five year old darling who came to visit me in my little tutoring room this past spring.  He was just finishing his kindergarten year, but his father was told by the teacher and the school district that Emmanuel was not ready to advance to first grade.  His papa could not accept that decision. He knew his son, and he knew what I would soon come to learn.

Our little Emmanuel was not only bright, but inside that tiny frame was the bulldog determination of a never-give-up hard worker. His wise father became Emmanuel’s advocate, and convinced the district to retest his son one more time before the final decision to retain him in kindergarten. That is how Emmanuel came to work with me for several hours per week this past summer.

And work we did!  He memorized sight words, segmented phonemes, read countless nonsense words, beat me over and over at The Train Phonics Game, and learned the names of geometric shapes.  I still smile when I think of that little voice flawlessly saying difficult terms like “rectangular prism.”

When we first began working together, Emmanuel had two teeth missing.  It was a challenge getting him to be able to pronounce the “th” sound without those teeth, but he practiced and practiced until he got it right. I can still see that determined little face working to form the words.  Small but mighty, Emmanuel did anything and everything I asked him to do, without a whimper or complaint, as we vetted him for the retest mid-July.

As the day of the retest came, I prayed and waited to hear if he had passed.  When his dad arrived at our center, he was all smiles as he proudly showed me the congratulatory email on his phone.  There were high-fives all over our lobby, and we took Emmanuel’s photo, with both thumbs-up, to put on our bulletin board to celebrate his victory.

At Oxford, we are in the business of helping all of our students achieve their individual goals.  If one strolls through our center during a busy day, one might hear Shakespeare, calculus, chemistry, or physics concepts wafting through the air. We take pride in our high school students who score high on their SAT’s and go on to Ivy League schools.  But we also take every bit as much pride in the success of a kindergartener like Emmanuel.

At Oxford Tutoring Center, there are no small victories.

About the Author: Kathy H. is a tutor at Oxford Tutoring who enjoys tutors because she can make a difference in the lives of her students.  Her goal is to make learning fun by teaching to each student’s unique method of learning.  For fun, she likes to read, binge-watch TV shows on Netflix, serve at her church, and spend time with her grandchildren.

Posted in college, College Admissions, College Planning, Education, Uncategorized, university

3 Tips to Stand Out to Top Universities from the Oxford Tutoring College Consultant

In the last year alone, the California State University system received a record 790,000 applicants by the twenty-three campuses.  These numbers are up substantially from the previous year and continue to increase each year.

Admission to a college in California is extremely competitive and preparing for college is a daunting task.  It is no longer enough to obtain a college degree (in fact, some students can even obtain a degree through online courses without ever having to step onto a college campus).

What employees are interested in is where a student receives his or her degree.  Students and employers are more attuned to where a college ranks on the scale of prestige.  Previously, a college degree was something to be proud of, and while this is still the case, where a student goes to college is a lot more important than it was a decade ago.

The campuses of the University of California have always had a prestigious ranking among colleges and now the secret is out.  Students from across the country and around the world are applying to the University of California in record numbers.  Last year, UCLA received 112,000 applications and UCI received 96,000 applications.

Then, how, with so much rivalry to enter top schools how can a student compete?  Here are three tips to stand out to the top California universities.

#1 – Start in Middle School

Changing factors over the past few decades have made it necessary for students to begin preparing for college admissions to the University of California as early as middle school.  Middle schools offer classes in math, science, and foreign language, giving the students the opportunity to complete prerequisites for advanced high school classes.  Students can complete courses in math through geometry, honor-level English and science, while also completing first and second year foreign language classes all before entering high school.

 

#2 – Excel Academically

Students can now begin high school qualified for honors courses, AP courses, and courses in International Baccalaureate where offered.  The students will also be better prepared for the rigors of a demanding academic curriculum through high school, which includes preparation for the SAT and ACT exam.

However, it is not enough to just take these classes.  It is imperative that students stay focused, work hard, and excel in these classes.  If a student is struggling to keep up with the challenging work load high division classes require, he or she should look for outside help.

 

#3 – Get Involved

In addition to a strong academic curriculum, students must also be involved in their communities and school.  Consecutive year involvement in clubs on campus, community outreach, sports both on and off campus, and other activities are not only desirable, but necessary.

 

Takeaway

The University of California remains an exclusive system that requires years of preparation.  The application process will continue to become more selective and the application pool will continue to grow.   Unless UCLA, or another campus, miraculously doubles in size, the road to admission will continually grow more and more challenging. In order to keep up with the competition, it is essential to make the most of academic opportunities and begin preparing for college as early as possible.  There is no “secret formula” to ensuring admission.  Hit the books and practice diligently, because the path to college admission is steep and demanding.

 

College Consulting with Oxford Tutoring

Need help making decisions to get into the top colleges?  Oxford Tutoring is here to help with college consulting services.  These services include planning your road to college, advising on difficult decisions, applying for colleges, and writing your personal statements.  Call us today to sign up for college consulting sessions.  (949) 681-0388.

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Credit for photo: Dowtowngal

About the AuthorBob Oxford Pic.JPG

As a reader for UCLA and UCI and an educator with more than 25 years of experience, Bob Trudeau understands how college admissions officers read and score student applications.  By applying his knowledge of the 2000 plus applications he reads each year, Bob can help each student present him or herself as vividly and professionally as possible, while helping mom and dad make tough planning and advising decisions necessary to stand out to top universities.

 

Copyright Oxford Tutoring 2016

Posted in ACT, Education, SAT, SAT Test Prep, student, Studying, Tests, Uncategorized

How to Overcome ACT and SAT Test Anxiety

There is no doubt about it – the SAT test and ACT test are difficult tests.  For many students, the idea of taking such challenging tests can fill them with dread and anxiety.  Because these tests are created to predict how well students will do in college, mountains of pressure are associated with the ACT and SAT.  Even extremely bright students are often frozen in fear when facing these giants.  Text anxiety is a very real struggle for many of our students. At Oxford Tutoring, we believe in not only preparing our students for the test as far as content and strategy goes, but also in helping them overcome their fear by giving them the confidence to tackle the ACT and the SAT.  Here are some Oxford Tutoring recommended steps to overcome ACT and SAT test anxiety.

Breathe

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It may seem simple enough – breathing is something we do without thinking about it.  But that is not the type of breathing we are referring to here.  We are talking about deep breathing.  The kind that, according Denise Scarbro, fitness and nutrition guru with a BA in Psychology, says, “The parasympathetic nervous system is what controls our fight or flight response. Deep breathing triggers our parasympathetic nervous system, neutralizes stress and elicits a calming feeling.” (Source).

The technique we recommend is something we call the 5-2-5.  For five seconds, breathe in deeply through your nose, hold the breath for 2 seconds, then exhale through your mouth for five seconds.  Do this several times at the start of your test, when you are practicing, or when you are feeling overwhelmed to calm you anxiety and relax your mind.

Still feeling stressed? It may be because you are breathing from your chest and not your stomach.  Place your hand on your stomach when breathing to ensure that you are breathing from the proper place to experience the full benefits of the 5-2-5 deep breathing exercise.

 

Practice

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Another basic but often overlooked concept it practicing.  Theses tests is beasts – they are almost 4 hours long.  Think back to the last activity you did that lasted for four hours straight.  Can’t think of one? That is because four hours is very long time for your brain to be focusing on one activity.  It is not natural and not what students are used to.  An hour test? Sure.  Maybe even two hours.  But four! That is gonna require some work.

Which is where practice comes in.  Just like in a basketball game, coaches cannot expect their players to be able to run for an hour or more without preparing them for it.  So players practice and build up their stamina. It is the same thing for the ACT or SAT.  You can take a test for four hours, you just have to build up the stamina.  So take practice tests in a setting like that of the one you will be taking the ACT or SAT in.  If you need a place to practice, Oxford Tutoring offers practice tests to help you conquer the ACT test or SAT test.

 

Prepare Ahead of Time

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Nothing will cause panic quite like feeling unprepared.  If you have not put the time and effort into getting ready for the test, then fear is a completely expected reaction.  Things are a lot scarier when you haven’t trained to face them.

So yes, you need to practice.  But you also need to give yourself enough time so that the practice will be a benefit to you.  Practicing the night before is not going to give you the confidence you need to take the test.  So start preparing.  That way you can walk into the room on test day and know exactly what type of animal you are facing and how to take it down.

 

Give Yourself Some Grace

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This is a hard test.  You are being asked to do college-level analysis and college-level math.  It is no joke.  Furthermore, most high schools do not have the time to prepare you with the type of knowledge you will need to have to take the ACT and SAT.  So, do yourself a favor, don’t expect perfection right off the bat.  It is like a marathon, not a sprint.  Taking our practice tests once or twice is not enough to get to the finish line.   It takes consistent practice, hard work, and time.  Show yourself some grace, you will not get there overnight, but if you understand that improvement is going to take time and are willing to put in the hours, you will get there.

 

Take the Test with Confidence

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You’ve prepared, you’ve practiced, you’ve put in the time, and you even have your handy-dandy breathing technique.  Now take the test with confidence!  You have got this.  You are ready.  Believe that.  We are rooting for you!

Need practice tests, private tutoring, or courses to get ready for the ACT or SAT?  Oxford Tutoring is here to help!  Call us today! (949) 681-0388.

 

Posted in ACT, Child, classes, College Planning, Courses, Education, Homework Help, Individualized Tutoring, K-12 Tutoring, New SAT, SAT, SAT Test Prep, Studying, Uncategorized

6 Steps to Prepare for the SAT

The dreaded SAT: a challenge that all high school student with dreams of going to college must face.  Success on this test begins with understanding the SAT test and facing it with courage and determination. In the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, an American politician, diplomat, and activist, “You must do the thing which you think you cannot do.”  The SAT may seem like a test too big to tackle, with some basic, manageable steps, you will find yourself on the way to not only taking the SAT, but conquering it.

 

Step #1 – Select an SAT Date.  Register!

It may seem like common sense, but with so many other activities, sports, classes, and studying, it is easy to let SAT test dates slip by without registering.  So, stop what you are doing right now.  Pick a test date, and go register here .

SAT Test Dates

The SAT test is offered a number of times during the school year.   Tests are offered on Saturdays.  Be sure to select a test date that you can feasibly prepare for. Be sure to take your other obligations into consideration, like finals, AP exams, sports tournaments, college applications, etc.

 

Step #2 – Set Score Goals.

It is important to set a goal for yourself.  That way you have a score that both you and your Oxford Tutoring SAT instructor are working towards.  This helps you develop a realistic expectation and provides motivation for you to do your best.  If you need help setting an SAT score goal, meet with an Oxford Tutoring SAT Counselor for free.

 

Step #3 – Track your progress.

Use the following chart to keep track of how you are doing.  That way, you can see where you started, take note of the areas that are still causing your trouble, and decide which subjects you want to continue tutoring in.

Track Progress

Step #4 – Study! Go to class, take practice tests, and do your homework.

While practice is helpful, practice does not make perfect if you are practicing incorrectly.  That’s where Oxford Tutoring comes in, with classes that cover content, teach strategies, and prepare you to achieve your SAT score goals.

Furthermore, when it comes to studying, treat the SAT like eating your vegetable.  Eating a few vegetables a day is manageable, helpful, and even good.  Studying is the same way.  Studying everyday is much more manageable and effective than trying to do it all at once.

Don’t try to do a week’s worth of studying in one day, just as you would not eat a week’s worth of vegetables in one day.  You will be healthier, smarter, and happier with consistent study.  And your SAT score will thank you! Consistent study builds long-term memory.

Step #5 – Focus extra study time on trouble spots.

Spend extra time on those areas that you are still struggling with.  This is especially helpful for critical reading and essay writing.

The following texts have been used by the SAT to construct SAT reading passages.  Thus, these readings are your best choice for practice of the reading passages.

Literature and Personal Narratives

U.S. Founding Documents (the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Federalist Papers.

The Great Global Conversation (Edmund Burke, Henry David Thoreau, Gandhi, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Martin Luther King Jr.

A speech delivered by Congresswoman Barbara Jordan of Texas on July 25, 1974, as a member of the Judiciary Committee of the United States House of Representatives.

Federalist No. 65, an essay by Alexander Hamilton

Richard Florida, The Great Reset

Social Science and Physical Science

Economics, Psychology or Sociology resources

Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, or Physics resources

Step #6 – Succeed! Take the test with confidence!

Oxford Tutoring comes alongside you to help you achieve your SAT goals.  Sign up for an SAT or ACT test prep course today! (949) 681-0388.

If you follow these steps, you will be well on your way to conquering the SAT and achieving your score goal.  Don’t forget, Oxford Tutoring is here to help offering SAT classes that come with a score guarantee and SAT private tutoring.  Call us today to schedule a free SAT Consult to learn more!