Posted in Child, children, Education, K-12 Tutoring, Learning Activties, Parent, Parent and Child, Parent Help, Parenting, school, student, Studying, Tutoring, Uncategorized

10 Ways to Help Your Child Succeed In School

“Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.” – John Dewey

Education is a valuable tool that can set children up for a successful future.  As a result, children getting the best out of their education is vital.  So, how, as a parent, can you come alongside your children and support them in their education?  Here is a suggested list of ways to help your child succeed in school.

#1: Set Up a Morning Routine

Rushed mornings can carry over into your child’s day.  We all know that there are days when hurried mornings cannot be helped, but for the most part, establishing a morning routine will help your child’s day start off right.  Just like children benefit from a routine at school, so too can they benefit from a predictable morning.

#2: Get to Know Your Child’s Teacher

This may seem like an obvious step, but it can be easy to become preoccupied with other priorities.  However, taking the time to meet and get to know your child’s teacher will open up the lines of communication.   When concerns or questions arise, having already developed a rapport with your child’s teacher will make possibly difficult conversations a lot easier.

#3: Volunteer at School

Furthermore, getting involved at your child’s school can be helpful in your child’s success at school.  You will be directly engaged with your child’s education by volunteering for field trips, after school activities, or in class help. With your help, your child will benefit from a more meaningful school experience.

#4: Stay Positive about Education

School is hard work, and when your children are feeling overwhelmed they are going to feel like their school experience is a negative one.  What they need is an education advocate.  By focusing on the positives of education and continuing your education through schooling, reading, and other learning activities, you will show your children why education can help them go a long way in life.

#5: Read Together

Children need to be able to read fluently, comprehend what they are reading, and analyze the text in order to excel in school.  Reading together provides you with the opportunity to help develop these skills.  Read together and talk about what you are reading with your child in order to build these skills and aid him or her do well in school.

#6: Talk to Your Child

Talking to your children about their day and what is going on with them is an important step to helping your child succeed in school.  This way, you will know what is going on with their friends, schooling, and other activities.  Even if your child is in the stage where his or her answers to your questions are “fine” and “good”, at least they know that the lines of communication are open, and they can come to you when they are ready to talk.

#7: Provide a Study Space

It is extremely helpful for students to have a quite place to study and get their homework finished. This can be as simple as a desk with a few office supplies on it.  What this does is provide a focused learning environment that children can consistently go to to get their assignment done.

#8: Prioritize Study Time

Make sure that your children are studying and getting homework done before moving on to other activities like TV and video games.

#9: Continue Learning over the Summer

Ever heard of the summer slide?  This can really affect a child’s learning as studies show that children can lose a full month’s worth of school learning over the summer.  Combat this with continuing education over the summer through reading, classes, and tutoring.

#10: Hire a Tutor

This may be last on our list, but it most certainly should not be a last resort.  Tutoring is a great opportunity for your child to get ahead, catch up, build confidence, and even more.  Check out our latest blog to find out why tutoring can help your child.

Conclusion

These are just some of the many ways you can support your children in their school.  Can you think of any other ways to help your children with their education goals?

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Oxford Tutoring

(949) 681-0388

Posted in children, Education, Parenting, Private Tutoring, Tutoring, Uncategorized

10 Reasons To Sign Up For Tutoring

Should I sign my child up for tutoring?  This is a question that many parents face at one time or another.  At Oxford Tutoring we want to help you make this decision; so, we created a list of reasons why tutoring may be right for you and your child.

To Catch Up

One of the most common reasons children receive tutoring is because they are feeling like they have fallen behind in a particular, or multiple, subjects.  By signing up for tutoring, you are giving your child the opportunity to catch up in the areas they are struggling with before they get too FAR behind.

To Get Ahead

However, it is not only about catching up, tutoring is also beneficial for those students looking to push to the next level and excel.  Tutoring can be a great option for those looking to push their education to the next level.

To Obtain Homework Help

Children are assigned a great deal of homework and it can be completely overwhelming.  Not only that, but it can also be a fight between parent and child to get it all finished.  With a tutor, your child will have a guide to support them with all the assignments they have, allowing them to breathe a little easier and to put down their boxing gloves.

To Maintain Skills

Additionally, tutoring provides the opportunity to maintain the skills that children are learning.  It can be easy to go over a concept in school and then forget how to do it.  Tutoring is helpful for those children who do not want their skills to get rusty.

To Avoid The Summer Slide

A common phenomenon that takes place over the summer is called the “summer slide”. This means that over the summer children forget a significant amount of material that they learned during the school year.  With tutoring, children can avoid the summer slide.

To Have Student Accountability

Sometimes it can be challenging to get children to finish assignments, study for tests, and complete their homework.  With tutoring though, you have someone whose priority it is to see that their children succeeds in their schooling.  As a result, a tutor is one who will keep a child accountable and make sure they are getting their work done.

To Learn Study Skills

Knowing the content is undoubtedly important.  But there is more to tutoring than just teaching the content.  Tutoring also provides the chance to teach your child how to study better.  Children can spend a great deal of time studying, but still struggle to retain the information they are learning.  This is often because they are not studying in a way that works well for their individual learning style.  Tutors can build a child’s study skills to help them study more effectively.

To Build Confidence

Many children come in and do not realize that they have the capability to conquer the more difficult subjects, like the ACT or the SAT.  But with time, practice, and a tutor to encourage them as they progress, children can gain the confidence they need to succeed in their schooling.

To Prepare for the ACT or SAT

One of the most important and challenging tests all high school students must face is either the ACT test of the SAT test.  Oftentimes, these tests differ from the tests they see in school in that they require different strategies and content not always covered in school.  Tutoring is an ideal way to not only prepare for these difficult tests, but also to conquer them.

To Receive 1-on-1 Attention

In school, though a teacher may try to give each student individual attention, with class sizes the way they are, this is rarely possible.  With tutoring, your child can get the one-on-one attention they deserve.  This also allows the opportunity for the tutor to teach to the student the way they learn.

 

These are just some of the reasons why tutoring is beneficial.  Students of all ages, struggling or maintaining even A’s, can benefit from the advantages tutoring provides.

Ready to set your child up with a tutor?  Call Oxford Tutoring at (949) 681-0388.

 

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Posted in children, Education, K-12 Tutoring, teaching, Tutoring, Uncategorized

10 Ways to Teach to Each Learning Style

At Oxford Tutoring, our teaching method means teaching the way each individual student learns.  It is important to incorporate various teaching methods that reflect your child’s learning style.  Which is why we want to give you the tools to help reach your child based on their individual learning style – whether that he or she is a visual learner, an auditory learner, or a kinesthetic learner.

Here is a basic breakdown of the three learning styles:

Visual Learners – These types of learners do best when they see information.  They are adept at recalling objects, shapes, and pictures. Ways they learn are through reading, films, videos, or demonstrations.  They have the ability to see pictures in their minds.

Auditory Learners – These individuals have to hear information.  With a “good ear”, they can hear differences in tone and rhythm.  Something that will help these children is if they are read aloud to.  They are capable of remembering what they had heard in lectures.

Kinesthetic Learners – These are the children who learn best by doing.  They require hands-on, interactive learning.  They will tend to learn best when they are physically active and have strong coordination skills.

The above is a basic overview of the learning styles.  To determine the learning style of your child, administer this quiz.

Check out this list of 10 ways in which you can accommodate your child’s learning style.

 

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Visual Learners

  1. Use maps, flow charts, or webs to organize materials.
  2. Have students color code books/notes to organize materials.
  3. Write out checklists of formulas, commonly misspelled words, etc.
  4. Write out and use flashcards to review.
  5. Draw pictures or cartoons of concepts.
  6. Write down material on slips of paper and move them around into proper sequence.
  7. Use a whiteboard to note important information.
  8. Highlight important key terms in different colors.
  9. Replace important words with symbols or initials.
  10. Create visual storyboards for memorization purposes.

 

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Auditory Learners

  1. Engage the child in conversations about subject matter.
  2. Question children about the material.
  3. Ask for oral summaries of the material.
  4. Have them record lectures and review them with you.
  5. Have them record themselves reviewing the material (or a summary of notes) and listen to it together.
  6. Read material aloud to them.
  7. Have them put material to a rhythm or tune and rehearse it aloud.
  8. Have students explain their notes back to you.
  9. Use repetition for memorization.
  10. Read aloud to students and have them read aloud as well.

 

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Kinesthetic Learners

  1. Write out checklists of materials to be learned or looked for.
  2. Trace words and diagrams on paper.
  3. Use textured paper and experiment with different sizes of pens, pencils, and crayons to write down information.
  4. Use role play or dramatize concepts. Students can move objects around or act out a concept themselves.
  5. Ask students to envision a scene in which the material to be learned is being used or acted our somehow. For example, imagine a student being a character in a novel.
  6. Have the student take notes while reading or listening.
  7. Use some form of body movement (snapping your finger, mouthing ideas, pacing) while reciting material to be learned.
  8. Use real life examples, applications, and case studies to summarize difficult concepts.
  9. Use pictures and photographs that illustrate your ideas.
  10. Have students draw diagrams of the information they are learning.

 

We hope that this list allows you to help your children with their schooling.  Because we incorporate these various teaching strategies into our tutoring method, you can count on Oxford Tutoring to teach the way you learn.  Call us to schedule an appointment today! (949) 681-0388.

Posted in Education, school, student, Studying, Uncategorized

6 Ways to Prepare for Finals

Finals time is right around the corner.  Now is the time to start preparing.  Do not wait until the last minute to get ready.  Instead read our following list of the 6 ways to prepare for finals.

1. Plan Ahead

Many students make the mistake of studying the night before the test.  This is a mistake for a couple of reasons.  First off, the likelihood of retaining the information is significantly lowered.  If however, you study over time, you will find that remembering the information will be much easier.  Secondly, it is going to add undue stress to your studying and ultimately will affect you when it is time to take the test.  Planning to study ahead of time will give you the confidence you need to conquer your finals.

2. Create a Study Schedule

This goes hand in hand with planning ahead.  When you are prepping ahead of time, you will have the opportunity to write up a study schedule.  Spend more time on the subjects that are more difficult with you.  Also, consider switching subjects every hour or two.  This can prevent the tiring out we often experience when we spend too much time on one subject.

3. Form Study Groups

There is a great advantage to studying in groups.  This allows you to have assistance when you come across an area of the subject you struggle with or are unfamiliar with. Furthermore, you are given the opportunity to be taught and to teach – both of which are conducive to your learning the material.  So get together with a couple of friends from class to prepare for finals.

4. Take Breaks

You would be surprised how much taking a break – even just for 15 or 20 minutes – can increase your focus.  If possible, take a break every hour or so.  Eat healthy snack, grab some fresh air, or get some exercise.  This will help you come back refreshed and ready to keep studying.  Don’t watch TV, play video games, or go on social media.  These activities do very little to give your brain a rest – which is the goal of taking breaks.

5. Sleep Well

This may seem simple and obvious.  However, some students adhere to staying up all night the night before the final thinking that this will help them score higher.  There is not much evidence to back this up.  In fact, to function well your brain needs rest.  By studying ahead of time, you will be able to get to bed early the night before the finals and come to the test well-rested.  This will also decrease your chance of getting sick which can often happen to students during finals time as a result of high stress and little sleep.

6. Find a Study Partner or a Tutor

Find a friend (one that will focus and take studying seriously), grab your books, and head to the closest Starbucks for some study time.  If you find it difficult to focus when studying with a friend, consider getting a tutor to help you prepare for finals.  I hear Oxford Tutoring can help out with this.

Conclusion

Following the above steps will go a long way for improving your scores.  So start getting ready now and try the above 6 ways to prepare for finals. Call us today for a tutor who can help you get ready for finals. (949) 681.-0388.

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Posted in Book, Child, children, Education, ELA, English Language Arts Tutoring, Parent, Reading, school, student, Studying, Uncategorized

How to Annotate – Close Reading

Is it enough for students to simply comprehend their school readings? While reading comprehension is necessary for doing well in school, in order to experience success in current and future schooling, students will be required to go beyond what they see on the surface and dig deeper into the text.

This is where the process of close reading can make all the difference.  Close reading is when we slow down and think about what we are reading.  An important step in close reading is to annotate, as this allows for greater focus and attention to detail. Keep reading to learn how to annotate when you are practicing the art of close reading.

Comprehension of Key Ideas and Details

Unfamiliar Vocabulary

To help yourself determine the meaning of the vocabulary word, find context clues.  If necessary use a dictionary.

Main Ideas

Take notes on the central themes, clues or details that back up the main idea and themes.

Confusing Parts

Find unfamiliar details that you might need to clarify through re-reading, summarizing, discussion or research.

Questions to Ask

Who are the main characters?

What is the setting?

What is the main conflict?

 

 

Analyze the Text for Craft and Structure

Repeated Themes or Ideas

Think about the genre of the work and the ideas, use of language, and any lesson or moral.

Character or Author’s Feelings

For fiction, take note of how the author uses dialogue, descriptions, things the character says, does, etc. to develop character.

When it comes to non-fiction, pay attention to how the author talks about the subject to determine his or her feelings about the topic.

Note the Narrator’s Point of View

Determine how the point of view contributes to the story.

Questions to Ask

Why do characters behave as they do?

How do their actions advance the plot?

How does the author’s word choice affect the story’s tone?

 

 

Integrate Your Knowledge

Connections

Compare and contrast this work with other works you have read, information you already know, and ways in which you can relate to the story.

Deeper Meaning

Find the important images and symbols to analyze their deeper meaning.

Effective Writing

Look for literary devices, figurative language, powerful sentences, etc.

 Questions to Ask

How has this work increased my knowledge of a subject or author?

What is surprising about the story’s outcome?

What did I appreciate about the author’s style?

 

 

Tools for Annotation

Make your annotation system your own, use colored pens, highlighters or symbols to annotate for the above list of items.

This process of annotation will help you read more closely and allow you to dig deeper to find more significance in the texts you are reading.  This will not only provide more depth to your schooling, but will also be an influence on your life. ­­­­­­

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Posted in ACT, Education, Individualized Tutoring, SAT, SAT Test Prep, student, Studying, Uncategorized

ACT vs. SAT Reading Passages

There are many factors that can help a student determine which test they should take – the ACT or the SAT. Variables such as strengths, weaknesses, timing, or style can all play a role in making this important decision.

Perhaps you are a student who feels confident in your math skills, so you can handle whatever math questions these tests throw at you.  However, your reading is an area in which you could use some additional help.  The reading passages will be the issue that justifies your choice.

If that is the case then this post should prove beneficial.  We are going to breakdown the differences between the ACT and SAT reading passages in order to help you make the difficult decision of which test is the right test for you.

Number of Passages

The SAT has 5 reading passages while the ACT has 4 reading passages.

 

Number of Questions

Every test you take for the ACT will have a total of 40 questions with 10 questions per passage.

While overall, the SAT will always have 52 questions, the amount of questions per passage will vary.

 

Timing

How much time will you have to tackle the reading passages?

Overall, for the SAT you will have 65 minutes, which breaks down to 13 minutes per passage.

You will have 35 minutes for the ACT passage, which means 8 minutes and 24 seconds per passage.

 

Passage Types

On the ACT, the reading passages will include one of each of the following: Prose Fiction, Social Science, Humanities, and Natural Science.   The Social Science and Natural Science passages tend to be more straightforward, and therefore less challenging.  While the Humanities and Prose Fiction passages require more analysis which lends towards more difficulty when reading these passages.  On occasion, one of these reading passages will be a paired passage.

On the SAT, the reading passages have one Literature passage, one History passage, one Social Studies passage (economics, Sociology, Psychology or another Social Studies passage), and two Science passages (there is a possibility that one of them will be a paired passage).  The difficulty level varies and very much depends on your familiarity with the subject and the complexity of the topic.

 

Question Types

The question types on the ACT will be the following: detail, words in context, generalization, cause and effect, inference, main idea, point of view, and except questions.

For the SAT, expect these question types: evidence, arguments, words in context, and synthesis (questions based on analyzing a graph).

 

Style

For the most part the reading passages you encounter on the ACT test are going to be more about what is actually in the passage.  However, this does mean that the reading passages in the ACT are going to be a little drier.

On the SAT test, the reading passages discuss more interesting topics.  But it will require that you dig deeper and analyze the passage for what the author is attempting to say rather than just what he is saying.

 

Challenge

The challenge with the ACT is time.  While the questions are more straightforward and the passages are more direct than the SAT test, you have significantly less time to read and answer the questions.  So if you struggle to read quickly, consider trying the SAT.

The struggle with the SAT is the level of critical thinking skills required to answer the reading passage questions.  If analysis is something that you find to be tough, try a practice ACT first to see if it fits your strengths.

 

Conclusion

Overall, both present their own unique set of challenges.  It really comes down to what type of student you are and an awareness of your strengths and weaknesses.

Still not sure which test is for you?  Sign up for a diagnostic SAT and ACT test to get a breakdown of your score.  We will even set up a consultation with our SAT and ACT experts to help you figure out which test is the best fit for you.

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Posted in ACT, Child, children, Education, student, Uncategorized

ACT vs. SAT Math Sections

Whether you are an interested parent or prospective student, there have been many changes to the SAT and ACT tests, so it can be difficult to keep track of it all.  As the ACT and SAT Director for Oxford Tutoring, I want to break it down the differences between the ACT and SAT math sections to help you determine which test is right for you.  Without further delay, let’s begin!

 

Content

The ACT has 60 questions but the source of these questions comes from more areas of math.  Here is a chart for the ACT:

act-math-chart

The SAT has 58 questions and more than half of it is focused on algebra-based concepts.  Here is a chart of what percentage of each math subject can be found on the SAT.sat-math-chart

 Timing

The ACT has one big section with 60 questions and 60 minutes.  That means, to get it all done, on average, you only have 1 minute per question. This is quite a bit less than what you have on the SAT.

The SAT is divided into two math sections.  The first section requires you to complete 20 questions in 25 minutes, and the second section contains 38 questions to be finished in 55 minutes.  This gives you 1 minute and 15 seconds per question for the first section, and 1 minute and 30 seconds per question for the second section.

Order of Difficulty

The ACT always has the first 20 questions as easy, the next 20 are medium, and the last 20 are considered difficult.  Their questions are a lot more direct, and will look more similar to math questions seen in school.

The SAT, on the other hand, somewhat follows a pattern of difficulty with questions in the beginning generally, but not always, being easier than the questions at the end.  The majority of the questions on the SAT require strong reading and analysis skills, and then once you have figured out what the question is asking, then you can proceed to solve the problem.

Although the difficulty does not directly affect the scoring, it does help people plan on how much time to spend on a question.

Calculator Usage

For the ACT, you will be able to use your calculator for the entire math section.   So there will be some questions that require use of a calculator, but it is useful to remember that not every question will need it.

One of the reasons the SAT has two math sections is that the first one is a non-calculator section and the second one allows calculator utilization.  So, strong arithmetic and mental math skills are very helpful with this section since you cannot check your answers with a calculator.   It also requires you to manipulate formulas to make the mental math easier.

Answer Options

The ACT will always have 5 multiple choice options to choose from when answering.

The SAT has either 4 multiple choice options or free response where the student must write on the answer.

Formulas

The SAT also has few formulas given in the beginning of each math section, whereas the ACT does not provide any formulas.

Guessing Penalty

There is no guessing penalty for either test.

Final Verdict

Overall, students who are good problem solvers usually prefer the SAT compared to the ACT.  For them, it is easier to quickly solve the problem and it is less strain of a strain than the ACT.

An ideal candidate for the SAT will have covered math through Algebra 2, and likes riddles, or games like Sudoku.

Students who prefer more common math problems and have a diverse math background prefer the ACT because the questions are easier to process, and require more of the math skills than analytical skills.

An ideal candidate for the ACT will have covered math through Pre-calculus, and can recall formulas from previous math classes.

Want to make sure you find the test that is right for you?  Take a ACT or SAT diagnostic test at Oxford Tutoring.  (949) 681-0388.

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David Lord

 

Meet the author: David Lord is the SAT and ACT Director and Math and Science Instructor at Oxford Tutoring Center in Orange County, California. He has helped hundreds of students achieve the SAT and ACT test scores they want and accepted into their desired college. He reaches his students through challenging them and asking questions to make sure they are absorbing the material they are being taught.

Posted in Child, classes, Courses, Education, Spanish, Spanish Tutoring, Uncategorized

Spotlight on Tom Beeman – Oxford Tutoring Tutor

written by Tom Beeman – Spanish tutor at Oxford Tutoring

Tutoring is a great experience for everyone involved in it.  For the student, it gives them the added help they need either to close the learning gaps or to further their knowledge outside of what is provided in the classroom.  But the positivity that comes from tutoring also applies to the tutor as well.  Having been a tutor at Oxford for almost 3 years I have experienced these joys first-hand.

As a high school teacher, I do my best to reach all my students, but with the large numbers in each class, it is difficult to meet the individual needs to each student.  However, tutoring gives me a great opportunity to spend a full hour just with one student focusing on the needs of only that student.  Tutoring Spanish gives me the opportunity not just to assist with completing any assignments the student has, but it gives me an opportunity to re-teach the material to increase long-term retention and application of the language outside the classroom.  It also allows me to provide additional resources for the student to use independently when he/she doesn’t have access to a teacher or tutor.

While I enjoy working with the student who comes in for a one-time session, my biggest satisfaction as a tutor comes from working with long-term students.  This gives me time to assess the students’ skills as well as their needs to be able to help them reach their end goal.  I’ve been fortunate to have a few students who I have been able to tutor over multiple school years.  This long-term tutoring has allowed me to get to know my students’ learning style to better cater my tutoring to meet their needs.  I have had the pleasure of seeing my students grow in their knowledge in the language and comfort level of using it as well.  It’s great when I see a student engaging in the target language without being prompted.  One example has to do with the difference between tennis vs. tennis shoes in Spanish.  The difference between the two is minimal and the first time I taught this to one of my students, it was a serious learning moment.  But over the course of time, it then became an inside joke between the two of us and one of us would bring it up any time sports-related vocabulary would appear.

But to me, being a tutor is not just about helping students with their academics.  It’s also about building a professional rapport with them to help with the whole person.  You get to know their favorite subjects, extracurricular activities they participate in at school, their college and career goals, etc.  Understanding their personalities allows me tailor how I tutor them so that they are learning in a way in which they understand best and they feel like they are being heard.  By helping them with their long-term goals, they become more enthusiastic about tutoring and are more likely to succeed.  It’s great when these students come back after they no longer need tutoring or have graduated from school and tell stories about how they were in a situation where they are able to communicate in Spanish.

For me, tutoring is a natural extension of my career as a teacher. I enjoy working with my tutoring students and seeing them grow as much as I do my classroom students.  One day, I hope they will see the value of tutoring and will become tutors themselves so that they can help others just as I have helped them.

About the Author: A credentialed teacher, Tom Beeman tutors Spanish 1 -3 and Spanish AP. He enjoys working one-on-one with his students to help them learn that it is possible to become fluent in a second language.  When he is not tutoring, he enjoys spending time with his friends and attending teacher conferences to improve his skills as a teacher and a tutor.

Posted in children, Education, SAT, SAT Test Prep, student, Uncategorized

What To Do 24 Hours Before the SAT Test

You’ve spent weeks, even months reading and analyzing passages, practicing your math formulas, and writing more essays than you’ve written in your entire High School career.  The test is tomorrow morning.  Now what?  It seems like you should be doing something.  After all, this test is a factor in determining what college you are going to get into.  But what should you be doing for the last 24 hours before the SAT test?

The last 24 hours count just as much as the any of the other hours you’ve spent studying for one of the hardest tests you’ll face in high school.  So it is important to take advantage of  this last bit of time to come to the test fully rested, prepared and confident that you have done all you can to conquer the demanding SAT test.

The following checklist will help you utilize the last 24 hours efficiently and effectively.

#1 – Take a Study Break

This piece of advice usually comes as a surprise to the students who have heard “study, study, study” for the last several months.  In fact, at Oxford Tutoring, we encourage all of our students to put in outside hours of work, instead of relying solely on the time they spend preparing with us.  They need to put in the work on their own time as well.

But the day before the test is not the time to do this. The day before the test is the time to give your mind a break.  You’ve put in the work already.  Trying to cram in more information will most likely lead to anxiety, a challenge that can be extremely difficult to overcome.  So trust that you are prepared, and set the studying aside.

#2 – Get a Good Night’s Sleep

Seems like common sense, but it can be easy to make the mistake of not getting a restful night of sleep.  Maybe you think it will be more productive to study all night.  Or perhaps you just simply cannot turn that Xbox game off.  Most likely, your nerves are taking over and making it difficult to fall asleep.

If that is the case, there are a number of techniques to try and set your mind at ease.  One possibility is counting backwards from 100 by 7’s.  Or focus on the different muscles by tensing them for 10 seconds and the relaxing them.  Start with your feet and work your way up all the way to your head.  What both of these exercises do is get your mind off of your worries and onto the task at hand.  Your mind cannot focus on both.  Often times, you’ll find yourself simply drifting off to sleep because you’ve taken your mind off of the anxiety.

#3 – Eat a Healthy Breakfast

Now it’s the morning of the SAT test. Time for a healthy breakfast.  We are not talking about Fruit Loops here.  We mean something substantial – protein and fruit are always a safe option.  Whatever it is, make sure you are giving your body the energy it will need for the long test ahead.

#4 – What to Bring

Make sure you bring all of the following:

  • A calculator
  • Two #2 pencils
  • A healthy snack
  • A light sweater
  • Your ID
  • You admission ticket
  • A wristwatch
  • A water bottle

# 5 – Get to the Site Early

You do not want to arrive to the test rushed, sweaty, and stressed after sprinting to the classroom because you are running behind.  Make sure to give yourself enough time to arrive at the site at least 15 minutes early. That way you can find where you need to be, check in, and get settled.  This will promote a sense of calm that is necessary for taking the SAT test.

#6 – Take the Test with Confidence!

You have studied; you have worked hard; you know this material.  You are ready.  Trust the tools you have acquired and the information you have learned.  It’s time to conquer the SAT!

Oxford Tutoring

Want to take the test with confidence?  Check out SAT private tutoring or SAT courses with Oxford Tutoring.  We are here to help you succeed! (949) 681-0388

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